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over 7 years ago

Home

by Royce Holladay

What is Human Systems Dynamics?

Welcome to the HSD Institute Wiki


This site is built for you:
* To find resources and supports for your exploration and inquiry into Human Systems Dynamics (HSD);
* To share your learning with others in the HSD Associates' network as well as the larger circle of friends and colleagues


Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what's happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at
.

This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

"HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/hsd_core


Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD "core concepts":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

"Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/challenges


Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today's turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations--even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

"Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/practices


One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The "Practices":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

"Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/applications


Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You


If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change--either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.

Models and Methods


The site is organized to allow easy access to any of the models and methods. Just scroll down this page and choose whichever image interests you and click on the link. You will be taken to a page that briefly explains the model/method and offers other additional resources that have been created to support its use.

pages. Models


over 7 years ago

About

by Royce Holladay
What is Human Systems Dynamics?
Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what’s happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at Follow @GlendaEoyang
.
This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

* HSD Core * "HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core
Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD core concepts and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

* "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges. Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

* Arenas of HSD Practice * "Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/arenas_of_practice
One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The Practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

* Applications * "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You
If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change—either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.
over 7 years ago

by Royce Holladay
pages. Practices
over 7 years ago

About

by Royce Holladay
What is Human Systems Dynamics?
Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what’s happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at Follow @GlendaEoyang
.
This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

* HSD Core
Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD core concepts and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

* Challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.
* "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges. Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.


Check out the Challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

* Arenas of HSD Practice
One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The Practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

* Applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You
If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change—either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.
over 7 years ago

About

by Royce Holladay
What is Human Systems Dynamics?
Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what’s happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at Follow @GlendaEoyang
.
This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

* HSD Core
Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD core concepts and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

* Challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the Challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods. Check out the Challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

* Arenas of HSD Practice
One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The Practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

* Applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.


Our Invitation to You
If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change—either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.
over 7 years ago

About

by Royce Holladay
What is Human Systems Dynamics?
Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what’s happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at Follow @GlendaEoyang
.
This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

HSD Core * HSD Core
Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD core concepts and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

Challenges * Challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the Challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

Arenas of HSD Practice * Arenas of HSD Practice
One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The Practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

Applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.
* Applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.


Our Invitation to You
If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change—either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.
over 7 years ago

About

by Royce Holladay
This site is a Wiki about Human Systems Dynamics. What is Human Systems Dynamics?
Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.


Learn more about the "HSD Institute":http://www.hsdinstitute.org. To learn the latest about what’s happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at Follow @GlendaEoyang
.
This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:


(add more...)HSD Core
Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD core concepts and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

Challenges
Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today’s turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations—even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the Challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

Arenas of HSD Practice
One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The Practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

Applications
Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You
If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change—either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.
over 7 years ago

Fractals

by Royce Holladay
Fractal patterns repeat themselves at different scales in a system. Created mathematically by feeding one non-linear equation into a computer, they create beautiful visual images, like the example on this page. When viewed on a screen, it is possible to zoom in to smaller and smaller aspects of the whole. At each level, the same patterns will emerge.

In human systems, it is common to observe this same type of scaled similarity. For example one short list of simple rules "(see Simple Rules)":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/simple_rules, when followed specifically, will generate similar behavior at all levels of an organization or community. Culture is a fractal pattern that fuels similar behaviors among all members of a community or group.In human systems, it is common to observe this same type of scaled similarity. For example one short list of simple rules "(see Simple Rules)":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/simple_rules, when followed specifically, will generate similar behavior at all levels of an organization or community. Culture is a fractal pattern that fuels similar behaviors among all members of a community or group.

For pictures of fractal images taken of the earth from Google Earth, follow this "link":http://paulbourke.net/fractals/googleearth/.
over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action

by Royce Holladay
Adaptive Action Planning is an iterative planning process
involving three questions.

# *What?* – We gather pertinent data from across the environment to develop a picture of the underlying dynamics of our current status. What are the patterns we see and what do we know about their impact on the system?
# *So What?* – We examine data to make sense of it. We come to understand what the “picture” of our current status means and begin to explore and plan next steps. We explore the impact of the system patterns on the whole, part, and greater whole; the conditions (CDE) that generated those patterns; and options for action that can shift the patterns to make the system more adaptable, more sustainable, more fit.
# *Now What?* – We take action and then pause for a second check to measure our impact. By following up and asking where we are now and what is to be done next, we start the next cycle in the iterative process.

Progressing through the three steps to collect and analyze data that informs next steps becomes an ongoing cycle that can be carried out at all levels of the system. This sounds and looks much like the "Plan-Do-Check-Act"-type models that are used in a number of approaches to change. There are, however, fundamental differences that set Adaptive Action apart.
--It is assumed that the questions are based in the dynamics, examining patterns of decision making and interaction.
--Analysis of those patterns focuses on understanding the conditions that generate those patterns.
--Some options for action can emerge from decisions to amplify or damp current patterns by influencing environmental conditions.
--Other options for action can emerge from decisions to shape new patterns by shifting environmental conditions toward greater sustainability and fitness.
--This approach to planning is intended to be iterative or nonlinear, meaning the cycle never ends. Each "Now What?" returns to a new "What?" to launch a new cycle.
--This constant cycling through means it can happen as in the span of a heartbeat or across the arc or a longitudinal study.
--The constant cycling through also requires that the we remain in a stance of inquiry, always watching and remaining open to what we can learn from the dynamics that swirl around us.

In a human system, long-range change can happen as individuals and groups use multiple and connected cycles of Adaptive Action to shape their own patterns of productivity and performance to support the overall, agreed-upon goals of the system. This shared direction and action is what we refer to as coherence in the system and is a more effective and productive approach to planning than traditional strategic planning.

Check out this video of Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, as she talks about "Adaptive Action":.Check out this video of Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, as she talks about "Adaptive Action":http://community.aliainstitute.org/video/glenda-eoyang-what-so-what.
over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action

by Royce Holladay
Adaptive Action Planning is an iterative planning process
involving three questions.

# *What?* – We gather pertinent data from across the environment to develop a picture of the underlying dynamics of our current status. What are the patterns we see and what do we know about their impact on the system?
# *So What?* – We examine data to make sense of it. We come to understand what the “picture” of our current status means and begin to explore and plan next steps. We explore the impact of the system patterns on the whole, part, and greater whole; the conditions (CDE) that generated those patterns; and options for action that can shift the patterns to make the system more adaptable, more sustainable, more fit.
# *Now What?* – We take action and then pause for a second check to measure our impact. By following up and asking where we are now and what is to be done next, we start the next cycle in the iterative process.

Progressing through the three steps to collect and analyze data that informs next steps becomes an ongoing cycle that can be carried out at all levels of the system. This sounds and looks much like the "Plan-Do-Check-Act"-type models that are used in a number of approaches to change. There are, however, fundamental differences that set Adaptive Action apart.
--It is assumed that the questions are based in the dynamics, examining patterns of decision making and interaction.
--Analysis of those patterns focuses on understanding the conditions that generate those patterns.
--Some options for action can emerge from decisions to amplify or damp current patterns by influencing environmental conditions.
--Other options for action can emerge from decisions to shape new patterns by shifting environmental conditions toward greater sustainability and fitness.
--This approach to planning is intended to be iterative or nonlinear, meaning the cycle never ends. Each "Now What?" returns to a new "What?" to launch a new cycle.
--This constant cycling through means it can happen as in the span of a heartbeat or across the arc or a longitudinal study.
--The constant cycling through also requires that the we remain in a stance of inquiry, always watching and remaining open to what we can learn from the dynamics that swirl around us.

In a human system, long-range change can happen as individuals and groups use multiple and connected cycles of Adaptive Action to shape their own patterns of productivity and performance to support the overall, agreed-upon goals of the system. This shared direction and action is what we refer to as coherence in the system and is a more effective and productive approach to planning than traditional strategic planning.

Check out this video of Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, as she talks about Adaptive Action. Check out this video of Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, as she talks about "Adaptive Action":.
over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action

by Royce Holladay
Adaptive Action Planning is an iterative planning process
involving three questions.

# *What?* – We gather pertinent data from across the environment to develop a picture of the underlying dynamics of our current status. What are the patterns we see and what do we know about their impact on the system?
# *So What?* – We examine data to make sense of it. We come to understand what the “picture” of our current status means and begin to explore and plan next steps. We explore the impact of the system patterns on the whole, part, and greater whole; the conditions (CDE) that generated those patterns; and options for action that can shift the patterns to make the system more adaptable, more sustainable, more fit.
# *Now What?* – We take action and then pause for a second check to measure our impact. By following up and asking where we are now and what is to be done next, we start the next cycle in the iterative process.

Progressing through the three steps to collect and analyze data that informs next steps becomes an ongoing cycle that can be carried out at all levels of the system. This sounds and looks much like the "Plan-Do-Check-Act"-type models that are used in a number of approaches to change. There are, however, fundamental differences that set Adaptive Action apart.
--It is assumed that the questions are based in the dynamics, examining patterns of decision making and interaction.
--Analysis of those patterns focuses on understanding the conditions that generate those patterns.
--Some options for action can emerge from decisions to amplify or damp current patterns by influencing environmental conditions.
--Other options for action can emerge from decisions to shape new patterns by shifting environmental conditions toward greater sustainability and fitness.
--This approach to planning is intended to be iterative or nonlinear, meaning the cycle never ends. Each "Now What?" returns to a new "What?" to launch a new cycle.
--This constant cycling through means it can happen as in the span of a heartbeat or across the arc or a longitudinal study.
--The constant cycling through also requires that the we remain in a stance of inquiry, always watching and remaining open to what we can learn from the dynamics that swirl around us.

In a human system, long-range change can happen as individuals and groups use multiple and connected cycles of Adaptive Action to shape their own patterns of productivity and performance to support the overall, agreed-upon goals of the system. This shared direction and action is what we refer to as coherence in the system and is a more effective and productive approach to planning than traditional strategic planning.

Check out this video of Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, as she talks about Adaptive Action.
over 7 years ago

Ethics as a Pattern of Behavior

by Royce Holladay
In HSD we define, “ethics” as the “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society. In HSD we agree that “ethics” are “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Additionally, Human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society.

The reason these agreements are critical to a system is that they generate patterns of interaction that ensure the sustainability of the whole. When people agree about their code of ethical behavior, they commit to behave in coherent ways, behaving similarly across the system. They communicate their code to each other, building capacity of individuals and groups to understand and adhere to shared expectations. They establish constructs, like laws and rules, that inform individual and group behavior and connect groups to each other inside the system. Finally they use that common code to measure continuous adaptation and growth of individuals and groups toward system-wide ethical behavior. These patterns—commitment, communication, capacity building, coherence, constructs, connection, and continuous adaptation—emerge in society when individuals and groups live by shared agreements. The benefit is that the patterns also contribute to the ultimate sustainability of the whole system.

People in the society promulgate their shared ethics by establishing rules that inform future behavior. Rules are codified to define the “law of the land.” Rules shape formal ethical codes for professional and social groups. Rules become the foundations for social mores that remain coherent, even as they vary slightly from one generation, family, or neighborhood to the next. The rules, or definitions of what constitute ethical behaviors, become the "strange attractor":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/attractor_patterns, setting the boundaries for activity, allowing individuals and groups to take specific and individual action within that boundary.
over 7 years ago

Ethics as a Pattern of Behavior

by Royce Holladay
In HSD we define, “ethics” as the “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society.

The reason these agreements are critical to a system is that they generate patterns of interaction that ensure the sustainability of the whole. When people agree about their code of ethical behavior, they commit to behave in coherent ways, behaving similarly across the system. They communicate their code to each other, building capacity of individuals and groups to understand and adhere to shared expectations. They establish constructs, like laws and rules, that inform individual and group behavior and connect groups to each other inside the system. Finally they use that common code to measure continuous adaptation and growth of individuals and groups toward system-wide ethical behavior. These patterns—commitment, communication, capacity building, coherence, constructs, connection, and continuous adaptation—emerge in society when individuals and groups live by shared agreements. The benefit is that the patterns also contribute to the ultimate sustainability of the whole system.

People in the society promulgate their shared ethics by establishing rules that inform future behavior. Rules are codified to define the “law of the land.” Rules shape formal ethical codes for professional and social groups. Rules become the foundations for social mores that remain coherent, even as they vary slightly from one generation, family, or neighborhood to the next. The rules, or definitions of what constitute ethical behaviors, become the "strange attractor":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/attractor_patterns, setting the boundaries for activity, allowing individuals and groups to take specific and individual action within that boundary.
over 7 years ago

Ethics as a Pattern of Behavior

by Royce Holladay
In HSD we define, “ethics” as the “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society.
The reason these agreements are critical to a system is that they generate patterns of interaction that ensure the sustainability of the whole. When people agree about their code of ethical behavior, they commit to behave in coherent ways, behaving similarly across the system. They communicate their code to each other, building capacity of individuals and groups to understand and adhere to shared expectations. They establish constructs, like laws and rules, that inform individual and group behavior and connect groups to each other inside the system. Finally they use that common code to measure continuous adaptation and growth of individuals and groups toward system-wide ethical behavior. These patterns—commitment, communication, capacity building, coherence, constructs, connection, and continuous adaptation—emerge in society when individuals and groups live by shared agreements. The benefit is that the patterns also contribute to the ultimate sustainability of the whole system.

People in the society promulgate their shared ethics by establishing rules that inform future behavior. Rules are codified to define the “law of the land.” Rules shape formal ethical codes for professional and social groups. Rules become the foundations for social mores that remain coherent, even as they vary slightly from one generation, family, or neighborhood to the next. The rules, or definitions of what constitute ethical behaviors, become the "strange attractor":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/attractor_patterns, setting the boundaries for activity, allowing individuals and groups to take specific and individual action within that boundary.
over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action Experiments

by Royce Holladay
People around the world are using "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action to work more productively in all kinds of complex situations. They face challenges that are old and new, but they are all wicked challenges because old paradigms, traditional approaches, and complicated tools do not work on them. In any other frame, these problems are simply intractable. From the HSD point of view, using Adaptive Action, new options for action emerge. These stories tell the tale. People around the world are using "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action to work more productively in all kinds of complex situations. They face challenges that are old and new, but they are all wicked challenges because old paradigms, traditional approaches, and complicated tools do not work on them. In any other frame, these problems are simply intractable. From the HSD point of view, using Adaptive Action, new options for action emerge. These stories tell the tale.

If you have a story to share, please do so...
* If you are an Associate, contact Royce and she will get you what you need to upload your own story.
* If you are not an Associate and want to share a story, send in a Word document to info@hsdinstitute.org and we will post it for you.

We would like to have as many stories as we can...What's your story?
over 7 years ago

Home

by Glenda Eoyang

What is Human Systems Dynamics?



Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what's happening with HSD, join Glenda Eoyang at To learn the latest about what's happening with HSD, join Glenda on Twitter at
.

This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

"HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/hsd_core


Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD "core concepts":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

"Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/challenges


Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today's turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations--even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

"Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/practices


One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The "Practices":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

"Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/applications


Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You


If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change--either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.

Models and Methods


The site is organized to allow easy access to any of the models and methods. Just scroll down this page and choose whichever image interests you and click on the link. You will be taken to a page that briefly explains the model/method and offers other additional resources that have been created to support its use.

pages. Models




This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

"HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/hsd_core


Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD "core concepts":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

"Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/challenges


Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today's turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations--even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

"Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/practices


One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The "Practices":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

"Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/applications


Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You


If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change--either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.

Models and Methods


The site is organized to allow easy access to any of the models and methods. Just scroll down this page and choose whichever image interests you and click on the link. You will be taken to a page that briefly explains the model/method and offers other additional resources that have been created to support its use.

pages. Models


over 7 years ago

Home

by Glenda Eoyang

What is Human Systems Dynamics?



Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways. This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities: Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways.

To learn the latest about what's happening with HSD, join Glenda Eoyang at


This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

"HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/hsd_core


Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD "core concepts":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

"Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/challenges


Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today's turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations--even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

"Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/practices


One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The "Practices":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

"Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/applications


Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You


If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change--either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.

Models and Methods


The site is organized to allow easy access to any of the models and methods. Just scroll down this page and choose whichever image interests you and click on the link. You will be taken to a page that briefly explains the model/method and offers other additional resources that have been created to support its use.

pages. Models


over 7 years ago

Home

by Glenda Eoyang

What is Human Systems Dynamics?



Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) is an emerging field of theory and practice that uses principles from complex adaptive systems to inform action in any social context. The study and application of the principles of HSD help build adaptive capacity in individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as they look for ways to live and work together in sustainable ways. This site is organized to help you know what HSD is and what it has to offer you in your own journey to build and sustain healthy, resilient relationships at work, at home, and in your communities:

"HSD Core":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/hsd_core


Human Systems Dynamics is a growing and emergent field of study that touches on a wide range of ways to see, understand, and influence patterns of interaction and decision making at all scales of human systems. At its core, however, are a very few, very powerful concepts that frame this new paradigm of thought an action. You can learn about the HSD "core concepts":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/hsd_core and their applications in human systems. This section includes a glossary and links to other online resources that will help you learn about HSD, as well as the HSD Institute and all it has to offer.

"Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/challenges


Our clients face huge challenges as they navigate today's turbulent landscapes. They are overwhelmed by the diversity of thought, culture, opportunities, barriers, and human potential that faces them everyday. They stand against forces from multiple sources inside and outside their organizations--even as their own decisions have impact in places and ways beyond that they think they can know and control. Finally they work in a constant stream of data, information, and feedback that contributes to their learning and to the complexity of the work they face every day. Based on our combined years of consulting and service in public and private sectors, we defined this list of challenges that emerge as our clients have struggled to build organizational capacity for dealing with their organizational and professional challenges.

Check out the "Challenges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/challenges page to see a list of the basic challenges we work with clients to address. Each link then takes you to a page of specific information that explains how we see the challenge play itself out in human systems, a list of tasks for leaders who want to meet that challenge, a list of core capacities necessary for accomplishing those tasks, and a list of models and methods we associate more specifically with that particular challenge. As you move from one challenge to another, you will recognize the overlap in capacities and models and methods.

"Arenas of HSD Practice":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/practices


One of the gifts HSD offers is its unique ability to explain underlying dynamics of human interaction. This has played itself out in two key ways as practitioners and professionals from around the world have come to use HSD in their work. First, HSD has contributed to highly effective practice in many different areas of practice and academic study. HSD Professionals come from a variety of field and sectors. The "Practices":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/practices page cites and explains a number of ways HSD principles show up in these rich and varied areas.

"Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/pages/applications


Second, HSD helps us understand how a number of interventions and programs work, providing us with a more powerful path for inquiry and intervention. Associates who have been trained in HSD also use a number of useful and powerful interventions as tools for understanding and shaping patterns in systems. The "Applications":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Applications page links you to a number of those tools and describes how they are used to build adaptive capacity.

Our Invitation to You


If you want to build capacity to adapt to turbulent change--either for yourself or for others, please use whatever you find here that helps. Our intellectual property policy states that anyone is welcome to use any of the materials or images they find here, with just two requests or obligations. First we ask that you cite the source appropriately. Second, we ask that, as you learn more by using the models and methods, you contribute back to the learning of the whole network by sharing it here or in other venues.

If you are an Associate, we invite you to add your thoughts and insights to this on-going conversation. If you have not logged on to edit in the past and need the pass code, please email Royce to get it.

We want to express our appreciation to the community of complexity scholars and practitioners who have contributed enormously to the founding and continuing evolution of HSD. We also recognize the power and richness of our network of over 300 certified Human Systems Dynamics Professional Associates who use HSD to address a variety of sticky issues in diverse environments.

Models and Methods


The site is organized to allow easy access to any of the models and methods. Just scroll down this page and choose whichever image interests you and click on the link. You will be taken to a page that briefly explains the model/method and offers other additional resources that have been created to support its use.

pages. Modelspages. Models


over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action Experiments

by Royce Holladay
People around the world are using Adaptive Action to work more productively in all kinds of complex situations. They face challenges that are old and new, but they are all wicked challenges because old paradigms, traditional approaches, and complicated tools do not work on them. In any other frame, these problems are simply intractable. From the HSD point of view, using Adaptive Action, new options for action emerge. These stories tell the tale. People around the world are using "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action to work more productively in all kinds of complex situations. They face challenges that are old and new, but they are all wicked challenges because old paradigms, traditional approaches, and complicated tools do not work on them. In any other frame, these problems are simply intractable. From the HSD point of view, using Adaptive Action, new options for action emerge. These stories tell the tale.
over 7 years ago

Adaptive Action Experiments

by Glenda Eoyang
People around the world are using Adaptive Action to work more productively in all kinds of complex situations. They face challenges that are old and new, but they are all wicked challenges because old paradigms, traditional approaches, and complicated tools do not work on them. In any other frame, these problems are simply intractable. From the HSD point of view, using Adaptive Action, new options for action emerge. These stories tell the tale.
over 7 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Leslie Patterson
Prediction and control are impossible in [Complex Adaptive Systems], and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has les to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried. This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
over 7 years ago

Maturity Model of Change

by Leslie Patterson
System change is constant in today's busy and adaptive world. Gone are the days when systems could afford the time and resources for slow, plodding change that may or may not outlast the lastest fad or approach to a challenge. Our experiences with change initiatives in many organizations over the past decade has shown us a startling fact: All too often, change initiatives that are touted as the next, best thing rarely get fully implemented. They seem to stall somewhere in the implementation process, and while some shifts may occur, full-blown change rarely does. We don't say "never" because we have seen some successful initiatives that were, in fact, able to become the way of life in the organization. What makes the difference between initiatives that stall out and those that are successful? How can an organization think about bringing about systemic change that becomes operationalized? Each system is unique, of course, so we can't say we know how that happens in all situations. What we can share, however, is a model and a method that can help increase the chances of successful implementation because it sets the conditions for adaptation across the system. System change is constant in today's busy and adaptive world. Gone are the days when systems could afford the time and resources for slow, plodding change that may or may not outlast the latest fad or approach to a challenge. Our experiences with change initiatives in many organizations over the past decade has shown us a startling fact: All too often, change initiatives that are touted as the next, best thing rarely get fully implemented. They seem to stall somewhere in the implementation process, and while some shifts may occur, full-blown change rarely does. We don't say "never" because we have seen some successful initiatives that were, in fact, able to become the way of life in the organization. What makes the difference between initiatives that stall out and those that are successful? How can an organization think about bringing about systemic change that becomes operationalized? Each system is unique, of course, so we can't say we know how that happens in all situations. What we can share, however, is a model and a method that can help increase the chances of successful implementation because it sets the conditions for adaptation across the system.

Grounded in the Landscape Diagram, the Maturity Model of Change by Dennis Cheesbrow, offers both a model that describes what happens in an effective implementation process, as well as a method for planning such an implementation.

Say you work in an organization that knows that a major technological change is on the horizon and your organization needs to plan for incorporating that change into your daily operations. At some point you step out into the area on this model that is referred to as the zone of Unknown Work. In that space, others have been working on answers, even before you have asked the question. There is a whole world of activity, learning, and innovation that is beyond your scope of knowing. However, once you step into that zone, you and your colleagues start to explore options for programs or answers that will meet your needs.

As you use data about your own unique needs, you look for ways to position your organization to deal with the looming change. This engagement with the unknown that helps you better understands your own needs and possible options is referred to as the zone of Learning Work because you are, in essence, learning about what's out there and how those options may or may not serve your needs. It is in this space that you ultimately make the decision about specific options you believe will meet your needs.

Then begins the real work of implementation that is often either shortchanged or even ignored--the important activities in the zone of Adaptive Work. It is in this area that you identify and address the ways your system must adapt to the new initiative--as well as the ways the new initiative will need to be adapted to work in your system. What capacities must be built? What new policies and procedures have to be developed? How will organizational structures and relationships need to shift to engage in the new approach successfully? The system actually remains in the zone of Adaptive Work until they system is prepared to accept and sustain the change.

At the point when the "new" initiative becomes the operational or daily practice, you have moved into the zone of Control Work. In this zone, slight adjustments and accommodations are often necessary, but because both the operational system and the individuals in the system are well prepared, the initiative finds the reception and acceptance it needs to become the work of the system.

Throughout the process, as a part of the adaptation, it is important that you and other members of the system identify old habits, perspectives, and processes that have to leave the system to create space for the initiative. The hesitancy to give up the "old" ways is often the most insidious challenge to the success of any initiative, and losing what feels more reliable and certain to employees can often create morale issues. Support, training, and transparency are critical to supporting this process of clearing the pay for the new way of doing business.

Finally, another task prepares your system for change, yet its importance is often overlooked. To reduce surprises, you must create transparency in decision making, and ensure that employees at all levels of the system are prepared and aware of the change. Adaptive implementation calls for carefully planned and highly effective communication strategies. As the system enters and moves into each zone of change, you create an explosion of communication to inform stakeholders of the progress around the change. Then as the system moves through the zone, periodic and consistent messages keep people across the organization informed of what to expect and what is expected of them.

As a "picture" representation of reality, this model creates a map of an effective change process. As a method, this identifies the steps and actions you need to invest in to ensure effective and thorough implementation required in today's quickly changing and resource-limited environment.
over 7 years ago

Stretch and Fold

by Royce Holladay
Sometimes referred to as the Baker’s Transform, this tool provides for intermittent cycles of stretching and folding across a system. Stretch refers to periods of hard work, steady growth, or large challenges, interrupted by times of system-wide relaxation and reflection.

Sometimes referred to as the Baker’s Transform, this tool provides for intermittent cycles of stretching and folding across a system. Stretch refers to periods of hard work, steady growth, or large challenges, interrupted by times of system-wide relaxation and reflection, which we refer to as folding.

Wise leaders understand this need for cycles of work and rest, and will find ways to support and instigate them for individuals and for groups across the system. They recognize that no part of a human system can operate on high levels 100% of the time. They use the periods of folding to engage in reflection and learning as teams examine their work to identify lessons to be gleaned and next possible options for action.
over 7 years ago

STAR

by Royce Holladay
The STAR Diagram was created by Brenda Zimmerman to support the work of non-profit boards of directors. It provides guidance for groups that want to maintain positive relationships. In such a relationship, each point of the star is equal in size. When one or more point is out of balance, the group will struggling to sustain itself.

* *Similarities and Differences* – Any group needs a balance. When too many similarities or differences exist, the group either is not cohesive enough to stay together, or it is so self-similar that it is no longer stimulating.
* *Talking and Listening* – Each individual needs to participate and honor others’ contributions. No one individual or group can do all the talking.
* *Authentic Work* – Group members must feel their work is important and has meaning. If not, they will engage in other places to feel more productive.
* *Reason for Being* – Similar to needing authentic work, group members have to believe in their reason for coming together. When they lose that, they no longer feel any commitment to the success of the group.
* *Same and Different* – Any group needs a balance. When too many similarities exist, the group is so self-similar that it is no longer stimulating. At the same time, when there are too many differences, patterns the system cannot settle into a pattern.
* *Talking and Listening* – Each individual needs to participate and honor others’ contributions. No one individual or group can do all the talking.
* *Authentic Work* – Group members must feel their work is important and has meaning. If not, they will engage in other places to feel more productive.
* *Reason for Being* – Similar to needing authentic work, group members have to believe in their reason for coming together. When they lose that, they no longer feel any commitment to the success of the group.
over 7 years ago

Simple Rules

by Royce Holladay
Simple rules guide behaviors and interactions of members of a "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cas. Whether by conscious agreement or by unspoken assent, members of a CAS appear to engage with each other according to a short list of simple rules. One group that we worked with has re-named the simple rules as "seed behaviors" to reflect their generative nature. Simple rules guide behaviors and interactions of members of a "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system. Whether by conscious agreement or by unspoken assent, members of a CAS appear to engage with each other according to a short list of simple rules. One group that we worked with has re-named the simple rules as "seed behaviors" to reflect their generative nature.

Simple rules establish the conditions that give rise to patterns in the system by shaping the "conditions":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde. These can be the covert agreements that emerge over time in a system, creating its culture. Often new leaders come into a system and state their intention to change the culture and "create a new world" for the workers, stakeholders, and customers. The problem is that unless intentional steps are taken to uncover and change the existing simple rules that hold those patterns in place, no amount of leadership command will change the system wide patterns. Simple rules can be used retrospectively to understand what shaped the conditions to generate whatever patterns are currently in the system.

On the other hand, simple rules can be used prospectively to shape a desired future. In HSD we believe that groups can identify patterns they want to generate and define simple rules that seem most likely to help them generate those patterns. What is critical in establishing system-wide patterns is that everyone has to use a shared set of simple rules at all levels of decision making and action. This requires a shared understanding of what the rules mean and agreements to use the rules to make decisions.

Effective simple rules:
* are few in number (never more than about 5-9),
* are general statements that apply in any situation,
* are always stated in the positive, and
* start with action verbs.

Simple rules are different from the norms we name for meetings and short-term interactions because they are intended to be more generally applied and not time bound. They are also different from values and beliefs because they are about action. They start with a verb, so they inform action.

The simple rules of human systems dynamics are:
* Teach and learn in every interaction
* Search for the true and the useful
* Give and get value for value
* Attend to the whole, the part, and the greater whole
* Engage in joyful practice
* Share your HSD story

See The "Simple Rules Foundation":http://simplerulesfoundation.org website for more information and examples of simple rules from people in diverse settings.
over 7 years ago

Simple Rules

by Royce Holladay
Simple rules guide behaviors and interactions of members of a CAS (see Complex Adaptive Systems). Whether by conscious agreement or by unspoken assent, members of a CAS appear to engage with each other according to a short list of simple rules. Simple rules guide behaviors and interactions of members of a "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cas. Whether by conscious agreement or by unspoken assent, members of a CAS appear to engage with each other according to a short list of simple rules. One group that we worked with has re-named the simple rules as "seed behaviors" to reflect their generative nature.

Simple rules establish the conditions that give rise to patterns people in the system want. Groups can identify patterns they want to generate and define simple rules that seem most likely to help them generate those rules. What is critical in establishing system-wide patterns is that everyone has to use simple rules at all levels of decisions. This requires a shared understanding of what the rules mean and agreements to use the rules to make decisions. Simple rules establish the conditions that give rise to patterns in the system by shaping the "conditions":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde. These can be the covert agreements that emerge over time in a system, creating its culture. Often new leaders come into a system and state their intention to change the culture and "create a new world" for the workers, stakeholders, and customers. The problem is that unless intentional steps are taken to uncover and change the existing simple rules that hold those patterns in place, no amount of leadership command will change the system wide patterns. Simple rules can be used retrospectively to understand what shaped the conditions to generate whatever patterns are currently in the system.

Effective simple rules On the other hand, simple rules can be used prospectively to shape a desired future. In HSD we believe that groups can identify patterns they want to generate and define simple rules that seem most likely to help them generate those patterns. What is critical in establishing system-wide patterns is that everyone has to use a shared set of simple rules at all levels of decision making and action. This requires a shared understanding of what the rules mean and agreements to use the rules to make decisions.

* are few in number (never more than about 7), Effective simple rules:
* are few in number (never more than about 5-9),

* are general statements that apply in any situation,
* are always stated in the positive, and
* start with action verbs.

See The "Simple Rules Foundation":http://simplerulesfoundation.org website for more information and examples of simple rules from people in diverse settings. Simple rules are different from the norms we name for meetings and short-term interactions because they are intended to be more generally applied and not time bound. They are also different from values and beliefs because they are about action. They start with a verb, so they inform action.

The simple rules of human systems dynamics are:
* Teach and learn in every interaction
* Search for the true and the useful
* Give and get value for value
* Attend to the whole, the part, and the greater whole
* Engage in joyful practice
* Share your HSD story

See The "Simple Rules Foundation":http://simplerulesfoundation.org website for more information and examples of simple rules from people in diverse settings.
over 7 years ago

Self-Organization

by Royce Holladay
This is the process by which members of a complex adaptive system build relationships, learn from each other, and create system-wide patterns. Through the process of self-organization, a system adapts to changes and challenges internally and externally.

Self-organization in neither naughty nor nice. We think of self-organization as a process that is intrinsically positive and good for the system. It can, however, create patterns that are internally coherent, but at odds with conditions external to the system. For example street gangs are very internally coherent. Their lines of authority, rules for membership, and boundaries hold them together and establish a tightly coherent system. It is when the gangs “bump” up against the greater society that they experience turbulence and conflict because they are not at all coherent with those laws and expectations. Self-organization in neither naughty nor nice. We think of self-organization as a process that is intrinsically positive and good for the system. It can, however, create patterns that are internally coherent, but at odds with conditions external to the system. For example street gangs are very internally coherent. Their lines of authority, rules for membership, and boundaries hold them together and establish a tightly coherent system. It is when the gangs “bump” up against the greater society that they experience turbulence and conflict because they are not at all coherent with those laws and expectations, and self-organization becomes more constrained.

Often people want to ask, "What is the target of a system's self-organizing?" In HSD, we borrow the old saying, "There is no there, there," to reflect that there is no one state or endpoint toward which the system self-organizes. Rather, a system self-organizes in response to the constraints inherent in the challenges and opportunities inside the system and in its greater environment. Self-organization is about shifting to release the tension among the differences in they system, moving it toward greater fitness. And because there will always be difference in the system and because the internal and external environments of a system are in constant flux, there is no end to self-organization. It is a continuous process of adaptation and seeking fitness.
over 7 years ago

Same and Different

by Royce Holladay
By engaging in open dialogue about how they are the same as or different from each other, members of a group can gain insights into their relationships and interactions. By engaging in open dialogue about how they are the same as or different from each other, members of a group can gain insights into their relationships and interactions. This activity helps to identify patterns of similarities and differences. It can help to identify unnamed containers in the midst of larger group, and name differences that matter, even though they may not be recognized.

In this activity, individuals use a “T” chart to list the ways they are alike down one side and ways they are different down the other side. In the process, many differences and similarities that are not really important will be identified. What will happen, however, is that at some point, someone will make a statement that “hits a nerve” and the group’s energy will shift. A loud, raucous group will suddenly get very quiet; or a quiet, low energy group will suddenly escalate. This is generally a clue that a truth has been named in a way everyone can recognize.

Working to identify their similarities and differences opens options for action as it identifies potential points of leverage to amplify desirable patterns and/or damp patterns that are less productive.

over 7 years ago

Radical Inquiry

by Royce Holladay
Radical Inquiry is a process of using three questions to clarify vision for an individual or group to help them identify specific actions for moving toward what they want. It uses a modified Venn diagram to explore the conditions (see the Eoyang's "CDE":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde model that can generate the patterns they want in their lives to move them toward their ultimate goals. Traditionally in a Venn diagram, the overlapping space between circles reflects the points of similarity in the two circles. In this application, however, the overlap represents the emergent patterns that come from the conditions represented in the circles themselves.

For example in the picture of the Radical Inquiry here, you see that where the circle labeled "Who am I?" overlaps on one side with the "What's important?" circle. It represents the emergent pattern that is possible when y take action to pursue what is important to you

* The "Sweet Spot" - In the center of the Radical Inquiry is a clear focus on the goals or dreams that the individual or group want to move toward. It's not a full-blown vision statement, but it does need to crystalize the purpose or focus that drives the work and action. Once that is clear, a brief statement is written in the center where all three circles overlap.
As you can see in the HSD Radical Inquiry, the "Sweet Spot" is the tagline we use, "Change the world by changing how we think about the world." We believe this captures the whole focus of our work.

* *Who are we?* – This question asks individuals and/or groups to clarify the identity allows a group to define who they are together and how they want to be known, if they are to move toward their Sweet Spot. It answers the question, "Given what I/we ultimately want, what identify is most likely to get me/us there?"
In creating the HSD Radical Inquiry, we asked ourselves, how we had to show up in the world if we were to achieve that Sweet Spot. What we recognized was that what we have to represent to the world is "Adaptive Capacity." That may not seem like an identity, but what it means is that when people think about HSD, we want them to think of Adaptive Capacity--we want that to be how others identify our work.

* *What’s important around here?* – This question allows a group to identify their differences that make a difference, how they contribute to the whole, and how they each contribute to their shared successes, relative to their Sweet Spot.
In the HSD Radical Inquiry, "Coherence" is the difference that makes a difference. It is the focus of each decision, the goal of each new learning, the solution we seek when tension builds across our system.

* *How do we share resources?* – The question in this third circle asks the the group to define how they want to relate to each other and to the greater environment in their work toward the Sweet Spot.
In HSD, the only way we believe we can build adaptive capacity and move toward changing how people think about their worlds is to stand in inquiry and to make meaning from that perspective. We believe that if we use that to frame our connections and our exchanges, we will be in the best position to engage with others, moving with them toward coherence and adaptive capacity.

Ultimately this model also reflects the patterns we believe will emerge at the intersections of the conditions. When we stand in the world as the source of adaptive capacity and we focus on coherence, then we believe the emergent patterns will reflect strong identity across the scales of the Institute and the field of HSD. When we stand in the space of adaptive capacity and remain in inquiry and meaning making, we believe the patterns that emerge will be about the the attraction of many other to the field, and its subsequent expansion because of the growth of new ideas and learning. Finally, when we focus on coherence from a stance of inquiry and meaning making, we believe we will generate patterns of clarity around our approaches and the credibility of both the field and the individuals' work in the field. Those are the broadest emergent patterns we see as potential outcomes as we make decisions and take action to set these conditions. * Ultimately this model also reflects the patterns we believe will emerge at the intersections of the conditions. When we stand in the world as the source of adaptive capacity and we focus on coherence, then we believe the emergent patterns will reflect strong identity across the scales of the Institute and the field of HSD. When we stand in the space of adaptive capacity and remain in inquiry and meaning making, we believe the patterns that emerge will be about the the attraction of many other to the field, and its subsequent expansion because of the growth of new ideas and learning. Finally, when we focus on coherence from a stance of inquiry and meaning making, we believe we will generate patterns of clarity around our approaches and the credibility of both the field and the individuals' work in the field. Those are the broadest emergent patterns we see as potential outcomes as we make decisions and take action to set these conditions.

Overall, Radical Inquiry is a process that can be used by groups of all sizes and individuals to help them clarify desired patterns of interaction and behavior, and to define actions they can take immediately to begin to generate those patterns.
over 7 years ago

Radical Inquiry

by Royce Holladay
Radical Inquiry is a process of using three questions to clarify vision for an individual or group to help them identify specific actions for moving toward what they want. It uses a modified Venn diagram to explore the conditions (see the Eoyang's "CDE":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde model that can generate the patterns they want in their lives to move them toward their ultimate goals. Traditionally in a Venn diagram, the overlapping space between circles reflects the points of similarity in the two circles. In this application, however, the overlap represents the emergent patterns that come from the conditions represented in the circles themselves.

For example in the picture of the Radical Inquiry here, you see that where the circle labeled "Who am I?" overlaps on one side with the "What's important?" circle. It represents the emergent pattern that is possible when y take action to pursue what is important to you

* The "Sweet Spot" - In the center of the Radical Inquiry is a clear focus on the goals or dreams that the individual or group want to move toward. It's not a full-blown vision statement, but it does need to crystalize the purpose or focus that drives the work and action. Once that is clear, a brief statement is written in the center where all three circles overlap.
As you can see in the HSD Radical Inquiry, the "Sweet Spot" is the tagline we use, "Change the world by changing how we think about the world." We believe this captures the whole focus of our work.

* *Who are we?* – This question asks individuals and/or groups to clarify the identity allows a group to define who they are together and how they want to be known, if they are to move toward their Sweet Spot. It answers the question, "Given what I/we ultimately want, what identify is most likely to get me/us there?"
In creating the HSD Radical Inquiry, we asked ourselves, how we had to show up in the world if we were to achieve that Sweet Spot. What we recognized was that what we have to represent to the world is "Adaptive Capacity." That may not seem like an identity, but what it means is that when people think about HSD, we want them to think of Adaptive Capacity--we want that to be how others identify our work.

* *What’s important around here?* – This question allows a group to identify their differences that make a difference, how they contribute to the whole, and how they each contribute to their shared successes, relative to their Sweet Spot.
In the HSD Radical Inquiry, "Coherence" is the difference that makes a difference. It is the focus of each decision, the goal of each new learning, the solution we seek when tension builds across our system.

* *How do we share resources?* – The question in this third circle asks the the group to define how they want to relate to each other and to the greater environment in their work toward the Sweet Spot.
In HSD, the only way we believe we can build adaptive capacity and move toward changing how people think about their worlds is to stand in inquiry and to make meaning from that perspective. We believe that if we use that to frame our connections and our exchanges, we will be in the best position to engage with others, moving with them toward coherence and adaptive capacity.

bq Ultimately this model also reflects the patterns we believe will emerge at the intersections of the conditions. When we stand in the world as the source of adaptive capacity and we focus on coherence, then we believe the emergent patterns will reflect strong identity across the scales of the Institute and the field of HSD. When we stand in the space of adaptive capacity and remain in inquiry and meaning making, we believe the patterns that emerge will be about the the attraction of many other to the field, and its subsequent expansion because of the growth of new ideas and learning. Finally, when we focus on coherence from a stance of inquiry and meaning making, we believe we will generate patterns of clarity around our approaches and the credibility of both the field and the individuals' work in the field. Those are the broadest emergent patterns we see as potential outcomes as we make decisions and take action to set these conditions. /bq Ultimately this model also reflects the patterns we believe will emerge at the intersections of the conditions. When we stand in the world as the source of adaptive capacity and we focus on coherence, then we believe the emergent patterns will reflect strong identity across the scales of the Institute and the field of HSD. When we stand in the space of adaptive capacity and remain in inquiry and meaning making, we believe the patterns that emerge will be about the the attraction of many other to the field, and its subsequent expansion because of the growth of new ideas and learning. Finally, when we focus on coherence from a stance of inquiry and meaning making, we believe we will generate patterns of clarity around our approaches and the credibility of both the field and the individuals' work in the field. Those are the broadest emergent patterns we see as potential outcomes as we make decisions and take action to set these conditions.

Overall, Radical Inquiry is a process that can be used by groups of all sizes and individuals to help them clarify desired patterns of interaction and behavior, and to define actions they can take immediately to begin to generate those patterns.
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