Changes

about 2 years ago

Learning Triangle

by Royce Holladay
The Learning Pyramid represents the self-organizing process that occurs when individuals bring together their theoretical knowledge and challenges with their practical knowledge and challenges to produce new learning. The Learning Triangle represents the self-organizing process that occurs when individuals bring together their theoretical knowledge and challenges with their practical knowledge and challenges to produce new learning.

At each level, new learning feeds back into practice, resulting in further learning. These iterative cycles continue to build new theory and practice as the individual continues to enrich the theory base and hone skills.

This model can be used to inform instructional and curricular design to improve and/or increase the learning experiences that support and reinforce the cycle. Sharing awareness of what is needed - the challenges - and sharing what new knowledge is gained - results of experiences with Adaptive Actions - are key parts for effective Learning Pyramid practice. It's part of the reason for the simple rule: Share your HSD Stories. Learning from failures and building up everyone's portfolio in the skill sets in the HSD Learning Pyramid is good practice for all Associates. This model can be used to inform instructional and curricular design to improve and/or increase the learning experiences that support and reinforce the cycle. Sharing awareness of what is needed - the challenges - and sharing what new knowledge is gained - results of experiences with Adaptive Actions - are key parts for effective Learning Triangle practice. It's part of the reason for the simple rule: Share your HSD Stories. Learning from failures and building up everyone's portfolio in the skill sets in the HSD Learning Triangle is good practice for all Associates.

So thank you in advance, for continuing to contribute to the strength of the Learning Pyramid. So thank you in advance, for continuing to contribute to the strength of the Learning Triangle.
about 2 years ago

Listening

by Heather Oxman
Listening is paying attention to someone with your whole self. It is not just hearing with the ear, but with the heart, the mind and the body. And in some instances, the soul. In order to see, understand and influence patterns in systems, listening is a crucial skill, for it is in the nuances and shadows of what is said that patterns for shifting and for asking questions can best be found. What is obvious remains obvious. What is missing, or what is not said, or what remains silent and small and nearly invisible, comes up when you listen carefully for the patterns of avoidance, deference, glances cast, leaning, or pursed lips.

Listening is realizing that there are at least ten possibilities creating challenges in communication between any two people. But they try anyway...
What I think;
What I want to say;
What I believe I said;
What I said;
What you wished to hear;
What you believed you heard;
What you heard;
What you want to understand;
What you think you understood; and
What you understand. (from Lynn Doiron Smith)

Listen for the [Four Truths]. Look for [CDE]. Stand in [inquiry] while searching for the patterns with similarities, differences and connections. Listening will get you there. Listen for the [4 Truths]. Look for [CDE]. Stand in [Inquiry] while searching for the patterns with similarities, differences and connections. Listening will get you there.
about 2 years ago

Listening

by Heather Oxman
Listening is paying attention to someone with your whole self. It is not just hearing with the ear, but with the heart, the mind and the body. And in some instances, the soul. In order to see, understand and influence patterns in systems, listening is a crucial skill, for it is in the nuances and shadows of what is said that patterns for shifting and for asking questions can best be found. What is obvious remains obvious. What is missing, or what is not said, or what remains silent and small and nearly invisible, comes up when you listen carefully for the patterns of avoidance, deference, glances cast, leaning, or pursed lips.

Listening is realizing that there are at least ten possibilities creating challenges in communication between any two people. But they try anyway...
What I think;
What I want to say;
What I believe I said;
What I said;
What you wished to hear;
What you believed you heard;
What you heard;
What you want to understand;
What you think you understood; and
What you understand. (from Lynn Doiron Smith)

Listen for the [Four Truths]. Look for [CDE], find the patterns with similarities, differences and connections. Listening will get you there. Listen for the [Four Truths]. Look for [CDE]. Stand in [inquiry] while searching for the patterns with similarities, differences and connections. Listening will get you there.
about 2 years ago

Listening

by Heather Oxman
Listening is paying attention to someone with your whole self. It is not just hearing with the ear, but with the heart, the mind and the body. And in some instances, the soul. In order to see, understand and influence patterns in systems, listening is a crucial skill, for it is in the nuances and shadows of what is said that patterns for shifting and for asking questions can best be found. What is obvious remains obvious. What is missing, or what is not said, or what remains silent and small and nearly invisible, comes up when you listen carefully for the patterns of avoidance, deference, glances cast, leaning, or pursed lips.

Listening is realizing that there are at least ten possibilities creating challenges in communication between any two people. But they try anyway...
What I think;
What I want to say;
What I believe I said;
What I said;
What you wished to hear;
What you believed you heard;
What you heard;
What you want to understand;
What you think you understood; and
What you understand. (from Lynn Doiron Smith)

Listen for the [Four Truths]. Look for [CDE], find the patterns with similarities, differences and connections. Listening will get you there.
about 2 years ago

Learning Triangle

by Heather Oxman
The Learning Triangle represents the self-organizing process that occurs when individuals bring together their theoretical knowledge/challenges with their practical knowledge/challenges to produce new learning. The Learning Pyramid represents the self-organizing process that occurs when individuals bring together their theoretical knowledge and challenges with their practical knowledge and challenges to produce new learning.

At each level new learning feeds back into practice, resulting in further learning. These iterative cycles continue to build new theory and practice as the individual continues to enrich the theory base and hone skills. At each level, new learning feeds back into practice, resulting in further learning. These iterative cycles continue to build new theory and practice as the individual continues to enrich the theory base and hone skills.

This model can be used to inform instructional and curricular design to build in experiences that support and reinforce the cycle. This model can be used to inform instructional and curricular design to improve and/or increase the learning experiences that support and reinforce the cycle. Sharing awareness of what is needed - the challenges - and sharing what new knowledge is gained - results of experiences with Adaptive Actions - are key parts for effective Learning Pyramid practice. It's part of the reason for the simple rule: Share your HSD Stories. Learning from failures and building up everyone's portfolio in the skill sets in the HSD Learning Pyramid is good practice for all Associates.

So thank you in advance, for continuing to contribute to the strength of the Learning Pyramid.
about 2 years ago

Landscape Diagram

by Heather Oxman
The Landscape Diagram demonstrates the impact of constraints on a system. It gives you a "map" or picture of how those constraints influence patterns of activity and decision making across the whole system.

The two axes represent two critical dimensions of human interaction.
* The "X", or horizontal, axis represents the *degree of certainty* in the system, and describes a continuum from "Close to" certainty, which represents a high degree of certainty, to "Far from" certainty, which represents little or no certainty among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to certainty" they are more able to predict the impact of a decision or action or can more clearly describe what is happening because the system is constrained in such a way that uncertainty is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of certainty include close coupling, strong enforcement of multiple maximum specifications, limited diversity, small spaces or containers.

* The "Y", or vertical, axis represents the *degree of agreement* in the system, describing a continuum from "Close to" agreement, which represents strong agreement, to "Far from" agreement, which represents little or no agreement, or even disagreement among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to agreement," they see things in similar ways or they respond to stimula in ways that are similar to the responses of other agents in the system. The system is constrained in such a way that disagreement is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of agreement in a system include commitment to a shared goal, fear of punishment or retribution for disagreeing, clearly stated expectations, or high levels of similarity.

Activities and interactions in any system can be assigned to one of three zones, based on the level of constraint, relative to either or both dimensions. Given any particular situation, the two dimensions can be graphed according to the constraints that are in action.

* *Organized Zone* - Close to both Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by procedure, rules, and policies. It is highly predictable and constrained.
* *Self-Organizing Zone* – Further from Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by simple rules. It is the area of learning, relationships, creativity, and innovation, sometimes referred to as the area of emergence.
* *Unorganized Zone* – Far from both Agreement and Certainty – this zone is characterized by unconnected blips and trends that may or may not have meaning in the system. It is an area of random activity, unpredictability, and surprise, sometimes referred to as the area of chaos.
* *Self-Organizing Zone* – Further from Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by simple rules. It is the area of learning, relationships, creativity, and innovation.
* *Unorganized Zone* – Far from both Agreement and Certainty – this zone is characterized by unconnected blips and trends that may or may not have meaning in the system. It is an area of random activity, unpredictability, and surprise.


When system [Constraints] increase, activities move toward the Organized Zone. As constraints decrease, they move toward the Unorganized Zone.

NOTE: Any given map on the Landscape Diagram represents a single situation or event or set of conditions. What is highly constrained for one situation can show up as random and unconstrained in another. For instance, Company A may have done major research and development on an idea and created a new level of technology or product development that another group or Company B has no idea about. For Company B, those ideas are still highly unconstrained--individuals in that group are far from both agreement and certainty about it. Once they become aware of the idea, it begins to be constrained and moves into the self-organizing realm as patterns emerge in Company B about the new idea's/product's use and/or value to them. Plus...

NOTE: Any given map may change across time or circumstance. Say that Company B becomes aware of the new idea and begins to consider its possibilities, opportunities, and limitations, patterns begin to emerge as agents in the system move toward higher levels of agreement and certainty. Say that Company B likes the new idea/product so much they decide to adopt it as their own. Then they have work to do to help increase agreement and certainty, often to the level of the organized zone. This phenomenon is described by the "Maturity Model of Change.":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/maturity_model_of_change and becomes the basis of a useful tool for helping us understand and move through change in a relationship or organization.
about 2 years ago

Landscape Diagram

by Heather Oxman
The Landscape Diagram represents the impact of constraints on a system. It represents a "map" or picture of how those constraints influence patterns of activity and decision making across the whole system. The Landscape Diagram demonstrates the impact of constraints on a system. It gives you a "map" or picture of how those constraints influence patterns of activity and decision making across the whole system.

The two axes represent two critical dimensions of human interaction.
* The "X" or horizontal axis represents the degree of certainty in the system, and describes a continuum from "Close to" certainty, which represents a high degree of certainty, to "Far from" certainty, which represents little or no certainty among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to certainty" they are more able to predict the impact of a decision or action or more clearly describe what is happening because the system is constrained in such a way that uncertainty is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of certainty include close coupling, strong enforcement of multiple maximum specifications, limited diversity, small spaces or containers. * The "X", or horizontal, axis represents the *degree of certainty* in the system, and describes a continuum from "Close to" certainty, which represents a high degree of certainty, to "Far from" certainty, which represents little or no certainty among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to certainty" they are more able to predict the impact of a decision or action or can more clearly describe what is happening because the system is constrained in such a way that uncertainty is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of certainty include close coupling, strong enforcement of multiple maximum specifications, limited diversity, small spaces or containers.

* The "Y" or vertical axis represents the degree or agreement in the system, describing a continuum from "Close to" agreement, which represents strong agreement, to "Far from" agreement, which represents little or no agreement, or even disagreement among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to agreement," they see things in similar ways or they respond to stimula in ways that are similar to the responses of other agents in the system. The system is constrained in such a way that disagreement is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of agreement in a system include commitment to a shared goal, fear of punishment or retribution for disagreeing, clearly stated expectations, high levels of similarity. * The "Y", or vertical, axis represents the *degree of agreement* in the system, describing a continuum from "Close to" agreement, which represents strong agreement, to "Far from" agreement, which represents little or no agreement, or even disagreement among the agents in a system. When agents in a system are "Close to agreement," they see things in similar ways or they respond to stimula in ways that are similar to the responses of other agents in the system. The system is constrained in such a way that disagreement is minimized or eliminated. Some examples of constraints that bring high levels of agreement in a system include commitment to a shared goal, fear of punishment or retribution for disagreeing, clearly stated expectations, or high levels of similarity.

Activities and interactions in any system can be assigned to one of three zones, based on the level of constraint, relative to either or both dimensions. Given any particular situation, the two dimensions can be graphed according to the constraints that are in action.

* *Organized Zone* - Close to Agreement and close to Certainty – this zone is is governed by procedure, rules, and policies. It is highly predictable and constrained.
* *Self-Organizing Zone* – Further from Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by simple rules. It is the area of learning, relationships, creativity, and innovation.
* *Unorganized Zone* – Far from Agreement and Certainty – this zone is characterized by unconnected blips and trends that may or may not have meaning in the system. It is an area of random activity, unpredictability, and surprise.
* *Organized Zone* - Close to both Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by procedure, rules, and policies. It is highly predictable and constrained.
* *Self-Organizing Zone* – Further from Agreement and Certainty – this zone is governed by simple rules. It is the area of learning, relationships, creativity, and innovation, sometimes referred to as the area of emergence.
* *Unorganized Zone* – Far from both Agreement and Certainty – this zone is characterized by unconnected blips and trends that may or may not have meaning in the system. It is an area of random activity, unpredictability, and surprise, sometimes referred to as the area of chaos.


When system [Constraints] increase, activities move toward the Organized Zone. As constraints decrease, they move toward the Unorganized Zone.

NOTE: Any given map on the Landscape Diagram represents a single situation or event or set of conditions. What is highly constrained for one situation can show up as random and unconstrained in another. For instance, Company A may have done major research and development on an idea and created a new level of technology or product development that another group or Company B has no idea about. For Company B, those ideas are still highly unconstrained--individuals in that group are far from both agreement and certainty about it. Once they become aware of the idea, it begins to be constrained and moves into the self-organizing realm as patterns emerge in Company B about the new idea's/product's use and/or value to them. This, then, leads to the second NOTE: Any given map on the Landscape Diagram represents a single situation or event or set of conditions. What is highly constrained for one situation can show up as random and unconstrained in another. For instance, Company A may have done major research and development on an idea and created a new level of technology or product development that another group or Company B has no idea about. For Company B, those ideas are still highly unconstrained--individuals in that group are far from both agreement and certainty about it. Once they become aware of the idea, it begins to be constrained and moves into the self-organizing realm as patterns emerge in Company B about the new idea's/product's use and/or value to them. Plus...

NOTE: Any given map may change across time or circumstance. Say that Company B becomes aware of the new idea and begins to consider its possibilities, opportunities, and limitations, patterns begin to emerge as agents in the system move toward higher levels of agreement and certainty. Say that Company B likes the new idea/product so much they decide to adopt it as their own. Then they have work to do to help increase agreement and certainty, often to the level of the organized zone. This phenomenon is described by the "Maturity Model of Change.":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/maturity_model_of_change and becomes the basis of a useful tool for helping us understand and move through change in a relationship or organization.
about 2 years ago

Inquiry

by Heather Oxman
In HSD, we believe that Inquiry is the path through ongoing Adaptive Action. In complex systems, there is no list of answers that works across one situation and on to the next. No single answer will meet the unique needs of each challenge, each person, each situation. So rather than trying to have the "answer," HSD practitioners learn to *stand in inquiry* -- carrying with them questions that help them see, understand, and influence the uniqueness of each new challenge. They learn this in consulting, teaching, administering, leading, evaluating, researching. Good questions lead to agile responsiveness and build adaptive capacity. Good questions feed and fuel Adaptive Action.In HSD, we believe that Inquiry is the path through ongoing Adaptive Action. In complex systems, there is no list of answers that works across one situation and on to the next. No single answer will meet the unique needs of each challenge, each person, each situation. So rather than trying to have the "answer," HSD practitioners learn to *stand in inquiry* -- carrying with them questions that help them see, understand, and influence the uniqueness of each new challenge. They stand in inquiry while consulting, teaching, administering, leading, evaluating, researching, and a host of other areas of practice where patterns emerge. Good questions lead to agile responsiveness and build adaptive capacity. Good questions feed and fuel Adaptive Action.
about 2 years ago

Inquiry

by Heather Oxman
In HSD, we believe that Inquiry is the path through ongoing Adaptive Action. In complex systems, there is no list of answers that works across from one situation to the next. No single answer will meet the unique needs of each challenge, each person, each situation. So rather than trying to have the "answer," HSD practitioners learn to stand in inquiry--carrying with them questions that help them see, understand, and influence in the uniqueness of each new challenge. They learn this in consulting, teaching, administering, leading, evaluating, researching---Good questions lead to agile responsiveness and build adaptive capacity. Good questions feed and fuel Adaptive Action.In HSD, we believe that Inquiry is the path through ongoing Adaptive Action. In complex systems, there is no list of answers that works across one situation and on to the next. No single answer will meet the unique needs of each challenge, each person, each situation. So rather than trying to have the "answer," HSD practitioners learn to *stand in inquiry* -- carrying with them questions that help them see, understand, and influence the uniqueness of each new challenge. They learn this in consulting, teaching, administering, leading, evaluating, researching. Good questions lead to agile responsiveness and build adaptive capacity. Good questions feed and fuel Adaptive Action.
about 2 years ago

HSD Theory of Change

by Heather Oxman
The Loopy Diagram demonstrates the connections between 1) the self-organizing environment - patterns and behaviours among agents; 2) Adaptive Action inquiries of a practitioner, 3) the cycle of the adaptive action inquiries and 4) the many HSD models and methods and connected mid-level abstractions available to the AA practitioner to apply during those cycles to create or effect a shift in similarities, differences or connections. The Loopy Diagram demonstrates the connections between 1) the self-organizing environment - patterns and behaviours among agents; 2) Adaptive Action inquiries of a practitioner, 3) the cycle of the adaptive action inquiries and 4) the many HSD models and methods available to the AA practitioner to apply during those cycles to create or effect a shift in similarities, differences or connections.

Each loop shows how change in one affects changes in the others. A smooth-running Loopy Diagram is an adaptive system, but any one of the four loops can be stuck. When a problem solving situation isn't working, one of the loops is stuck. Ask which one, take steps to clear it out, and move on to new and more productive cycles of reflection and action.
about 2 years ago

HSD Theory of Change

by Heather Oxman
The Loopy Diagram demonstrates the connections between 1) the self-organizing environment; 2) Adaptive Action of a practitioner, 3) the models and methods available. Each loop shows how change in one affects changes in the others. A smooth-running Loopy Diagram is an adaptive system, but any one of the four loops can be stuck. When a problem solving situation isn't working, one of the loops is stuck. Ask which one, take steps to clear it out, and move on to new and more productive cycles of reflection and action. The Loopy Diagram demonstrates the connections between 1) the self-organizing environment - patterns and behaviours among agents; 2) Adaptive Action inquiries of a practitioner, 3) the cycle of the adaptive action inquiries and 4) the many HSD models and methods and connected mid-level abstractions available to the AA practitioner to apply during those cycles to create or effect a shift in similarities, differences or connections.

Each loop shows how change in one affects changes in the others. A smooth-running Loopy Diagram is an adaptive system, but any one of the four loops can be stuck. When a problem solving situation isn't working, one of the loops is stuck. Ask which one, take steps to clear it out, and move on to new and more productive cycles of reflection and action.
about 2 years ago

HSD Magic 21

by Heather Oxman
In HSD, we believe that three conditions in the system shape the speed, path, and direction of self-organization--they shape the patterns that emerge in the system. In her ground-breaking research, Glenda Eoyang named these conditions as Container, Difference, and Exchanges. For thorough descriptions of these conditions, please visit "CDE":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde, a page of this wiki.

The HSD Magic 21 is a way of using the CDE to focus in on particular patterns in your system as you engage in "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action.

In the "What?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you see specific conditions that are shaping patterns of your wicked issue.

In the "So what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you consider the impact of each conditions and identify informed, wise action to influence your patterns.

In the "Now what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you take action, focus your attention as you watch for change, and move you into your next iteration of inquiry. In the "Now what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you take action, focusing your attention as you watch for change, and moves you into your next iteration of inquiry.

The attachment below offers a specific protocol for working through a Magic 21, and includes a specific example of how it can be used.
about 2 years ago

HSD Magic 21

by Heather Oxman
In HSD, we believe that three conditions in the system shape the speed, path, and direction of self-organization--they shape the patterns that emerge in the system. In her ground-breaking research, Glenda Eoyang named these conditions as Container, Difference, and Exchanges. For thorough desciption of these conditions, please see visit the "CDE page":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde of this wiki. In HSD, we believe that three conditions in the system shape the speed, path, and direction of self-organization--they shape the patterns that emerge in the system. In her ground-breaking research, Glenda Eoyang named these conditions as Container, Difference, and Exchanges. For thorough descriptions of these conditions, please visit "CDE":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde, a page of this wiki.

The HSD Magic 21 is a way of using the CDE to focus in on particular patterns in your system as you engage in "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action.

In the "What?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you see specific conditions that are shaping patterns of your wicked issue.

In the "So what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you consider the impact of each conditions and identify informed, wise action to influence your patterns.

In the "Now what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you take action, focus your attention as you watch for change, and move you into your next iteration of inquiry.

The attachment below offers a specific protocol for working through a Magic 21, and includes a specific example of how it can be used.
about 2 years ago

HSDLearning.org Guide

by Heather Oxman
HSDLearning.Org is your site for joining HSD Associates, Learners, and our Curious Friends in continuing the conversations about seeing, understanding, and influencing patterns wherever human live, work, and play together. To learn all there is about joining and navigating the site, download the attached document. Check out page 3 for instructions about how to sign on to the site. Thanks.
about 2 years ago

HSD Introductory Taster Materials

by Heather Oxman

As an HSD Associate you share your HSD story in many ways. These materials were created to help you plan and offer a one-day HSD Taster event. Use them as they are here or modify them slightly according to your needs.

As an HSD Associate you share your HSD story in many ways. These materials were created to help you plan and offer a one-day HSD Taster event. Use them as they are here or modify them slightly according to your needs. If you are interested in doing a Taster event, let us know at info@hsdinstitute.org and we can help you think through what's necessary. *What is a Taster?*
Networks and collaborations with whom you work, in your community or organization, may seek more in-depth descriptions and explanations of the basic models and methods and philosophy of human systems dynamics. This package of information helps you create a customized presentation to fit their needs and helps guide your presentation through HSD basics in a one day format. It can also be time shortened if needs be.

*So What do You have to do to prepare?*
Look over the materials. Brush up on the models and methods.
Find a location that is comfortable for the audience.
Invite people to attend.
Find out in advance what they would like to know more about.
Attend to the whole, the part and the greater whole.
Set a timeline for preparation.
Set a timeline for delivery.

*Now What?*
Keep it simple.
Give the presentation.
Stand in inquiry, and dialogue.
Seek feedback.
Invite interested participants to seek further training opportunities with the HSD Institute.
Provide links and resources.

If you are interested in doing a Taster event, let us know at info@hsdinstitute.org and we can help you think through what's necessary.
about 2 years ago

HSD Associates Handbook

by Heather Oxman
As an Associate of Human Systems Dynamics, you are a member of a global network of HSD professionals, and you have access to a number of resources and opportunities. The Associates' Network Handbook is designed to provide you with information you need to understand some of those opportunities and to make new connections or strengthen old tied across the network. This Handbook is updated at least annually and by downloading the attachment below, you can access this year's most recent version. Please let us know if there are additional resources you might find helpful here. Below, please find the Table of Contents to help you see what's available. As an Associate of Human Systems Dynamics, you are a member of a global network of HSD Professionals, and you have access to a number of resources and opportunities. The Associates' Network Handbook is designed to provide you with information you need to understand some of those opportunities and to make new connections or strengthen old tied across the network. This Handbook is updated regularly and by downloading the attachment below, you can access the most recent version. Please let us know if there are additional resources you might find helpful here. Below, please find the Table of Contents to help you see what's available.

Human Systems Dynamics Institute
Associate Network Handbook


Recreating Ourselves as HSD Professionals
Managing the Work
• Supporting Connections
• Finding What You Need
• Sustaining the Field

Engage with Deep Understanding of HSD
Fundamental Perspectives
• Inquiry as a Perpetual Stance

Apply HSD-based Models and Methods
HSD Models and Methods
• HSD in Work and Life

Build Adaptive Capacity for Self and Others
Product Arrangements
• Quality Standards
• Expectations
• Intellectual Property Policy


Feedback Form
about 2 years ago

Generative Engagement

by Heather Oxman
This model identifies specific conditions that create a culture of invitation and equity in a system. Using the [CDE] Model, it names specific conditions.

* *Identity* holds us together. We stand in a space where we see ourselves as alike in some important way. This answers *“Who are we?”*
* *Power* is the difference that matters among us, and we define power as the ability to influence. Everyone has power, regardless of accountability or authority related to roles. Individuals influence others and are influenced by others. This is *“What is important here?”*
* *Voice* describes how we share information and other resources. Individuals grant and generate voice as they give and take with each other. This is *“How do we share resources around here?”*
* *IDENTITY* holds us together. We stand in a space where we see ourselves as alike in some important way. This answers *“Who are we?”*

When we choose, moment by moment to create these conditions, we generate a number of patterns, best represented by: * *POWER* is the difference that matters among us, and we define power as the ability to influence. Everyone has power, regardless of accountability or authority related to roles. Individuals influence others and are influenced by others. This is *“What is important here?”*

* *Authenticity* – ability to be my whole self in all situations
* *Reciprocity* – free give and take between those who share this space
* *Justice* – equal access to system resources across the system
* *VOICE* describes how we share information and other resources. Individuals grant and generate voice as they give and take with each other. This is *“How do we share resources around here?”*

When we choose, moment by moment, to create these conditions, we generate a number of patterns best represented by:

* *Authenticity* – ability to be my whole self in all situations.
* *Reciprocity* – free give and take between those who share this space.
* *Justice* – equal access to system resources across the system.

*For more about these questions, see [Radical Inquiry]
about 2 years ago

Generative Engagement

by Heather Oxman
This model identifies specific conditions that create a culture of invitation and equity in a system. Using the [CDE] Model, it names specific conditions.

* *Identity* holds us together. We stand in a space where we see ourselves as alike in some important way. This answers “Who are we?”*
* *Power* is the difference that matters among us, and we define power as the ability to influence. Everyone has power, regardless of accountability or authority related to roles. Individuals influence others and are influenced by others. This is “What is important here?”*
* *Voice* describes how we share information and other resources. Individuals grant and generate voice as they give and take with each other. This is “How do we share resources around here?”*
* *Identity* holds us together. We stand in a space where we see ourselves as alike in some important way. This answers *“Who are we?”*
* *Power* is the difference that matters among us, and we define power as the ability to influence. Everyone has power, regardless of accountability or authority related to roles. Individuals influence others and are influenced by others. This is *“What is important here?”*
* *Voice* describes how we share information and other resources. Individuals grant and generate voice as they give and take with each other. This is *“How do we share resources around here?”*


When we choose, moment by moment to create these conditions, we generate a number of patterns, best represented by:

* *Authenticity* – ability to be my whole self in all situations
* *Reciprocity* – free give and take between those who share this space
* *Justice* – equal access to system resources across the system

*For more about these questions, see [Radical Inquiry]
about 2 years ago

Fitness Landscapes

by Heather Oxman
The idea of fitness landscapes emerged from the work of Stuart Kauffman "(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_Kauffman)":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_Kauffman, who used computer simulation models to represent how organisms interact with their environments to improve their abilities to survive. We draw from his work to see, understand, and influence individual and group success in a variety of situations. We find the model/method of fitness landscapes supports decision making and action because it helps people think in simple ways about the complex environments in which they live and work.

While landscapes in real life can come in any shape, we classify the whole array into three general categories. While landscapes in real life can come in any shape, we classify the whole array of landscapes into three general categories.

Single-point landscapes. Environments like these have a single, clear measure of success. No matter where you are in the space, you know what it means to succeed, and your desire is to move toward that goal. An organization that focuses only on profits shapes a single-pointed landscape. At one time, we thought public education and life-long employment were single-pointed because we assumed that everyone defined success in the same way: graduate or retire. In such a system, every person plans, acts, and evaluates success in light of that single, simple goal. When an organization frames a vision, they are trying to create coherence by shaping a single-point landscape for their diverse players and functions. The benefit of a single-point landscape is that it is easy to understand, measure, and motivate action. Decision making is clear, groups are aligned, and system-wide movement is unambiguous. The risk of a single-point landscape is that it constrains options for action and reduces individual creativity and freedom. It is also possible that the single point chosen is not the most productive or sustainable one, and it will ultimately limit the ability of the system to survive in a larger context. Examples of the risks of single-point landscapes are obvious in patterns of conflict, violence, economic domination, cultural bias, racism, environmental degradation, and nationalism. Single-point landscapes. Environments like these have a single, clear measure of success. No matter where you are in the space, you know what it means to succeed, and your desire is to move toward that goal. An organization that focuses only on profits shapes a single-pointed landscape. At one time, we thought public education and life-long employment were single-pointed because we assumed that everyone defined success in the same way: graduate or retire. In such a system, every person plans, acts, and evaluates success in light of that single, simple goal. When an organization frames a vision, they are trying to create coherence by shaping a single-point landscape for their diverse players and functions. The benefit of a single-point landscape is that it is easy to understand, measure, and motivate action. Decision-making is clear, groups are aligned, and system-wide movement is unambiguous. The risk of a single-point landscape is that it constrains options for action and reduces individual creativity and freedom. It is also possible that the single point chosen is not the most productive or sustainable one, and it will ultimately limit the ability of the system to survive in a larger context. Examples of the risks of single-point landscapes are obvious in patterns of conflict, violence, economic domination, cultural bias, racism, environmental degradation, and nationalism.

Multi-point landscape. Environments like this present multiple goals that are disconnected from each other. Depending on where you are in the space, your actions may move you up toward one goal or toward the other. If you are far away from either goal, a decision may move you closer to both, but as you approach the goals, you have to choose because a move toward one is a move away from the other. When parents struggle to balance professional and family demands, they may imagine themselves moving on a two-pointed landscape. If the space is conceived in this way, one solution is to have a stay-at-home parent and a go-to-work parent so overall, the family can reach both goals. Individuals who see such a space may construct two different strategies and alternate between them. Another option is to create one from the many, so that the landscape is simplified into a single-point landscape again. When the Natural Step folks "(http://www.naturalstep.org/)":http://www.naturalstep.org/ define sustainability as a "triple bottom line" they were bringing goals in environmental, economic, and human endeavors into a single focal point for success. The benefits of multi-point landscapes is that they make choices clear. The benefits of the single-point are still there (clarity, alignment, coherence), and some of the restrictions are removed. One has choice, and people can shape diverse paths to success. On the other hand, the two-point landscape adds a major risk. People on a landscape are trained to move up. Where am I now? What would be better? How do I get there? (Note: If this sounds like "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action, it is! Fitness Landscape is one of the theory bases that informs the way HSD uses Adaptive Action.) The problem is that this strategy may take a player to the top of a local peak, where they must stop because there is nowhere else to go. If there is, anywhere on the landscape, a higher peak, it cannot be reached by usual means. The system must be massively disrupted to move the player from the top of one peak into the range of another peak to begin a new journey toward fitness. Multi-point landscape. Environments like this present multiple goals that are disconnected from each other. Depending on where you are in the space, your actions may move you up toward one goal or toward the other. If you are far away from either goal, a decision may move you closer to both, but as you approach the goals, you have to choose because a move toward one is a move away from the other. When parents struggle to balance professional and family demands, they may imagine themselves moving on a two-pointed landscape. If the space is conceived in this way, one solution is to have a stay-at-home parent and a go-to-work parent so overall, the family can reach both goals. Individuals who see such a space may construct two different strategies and alternate between them. Another option is to create one from the many, so that the landscape is simplified into a single-point landscape again. When the Natural Step folks "(http://www.naturalstep.org/)":http://www.naturalstep.org/ define sustainability as a "triple bottom line" they were bringing their goals in environmental, economic, and human endeavors into a single focal point for success. The benefits of multi-point landscapes is that they make choices clear. The benefits of the single-point are still there (clarity, alignment, coherence), and some of the restrictions are removed. One has choice, and people can shape diverse paths to success. On the other hand, the two-point landscape adds a major risk. People on a landscape are trained to move up. Where am I now? What would be better? How do I get there? (Note: If this sounds like "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action, it is! Fitness Landscape is one of the theory bases that informs the way HSD uses Adaptive Action.) The problem is that this strategy may take a player to the top of a local peak, where they must stop because there is nowhere else to go. If there is a higher peak anywhere on the landscape, it cannot be reached by the usual methods. The system must be massively disrupted to move the player from the top of one peak into the range of another peak to begin a new journey toward fitness.

Rough Landscapes. Environments like this have many diverse and relatively equivalent goals. Players can move up and down, reaching minor successes and competing in narrower niches. In times of major disruption in social systems, rough landscapes are often a transitional phase. The old, clear, and dominant peaks are gone, but no new ones have yet emerged. We see this dynamic in personal transition during adolescence and late middle age when physical, emotional, and social contexts are in transition. It appears as depression in economic transitions when the successful strategies of the past are no longer effective and before new opportunities become obvious. It often follows the success of a revolutionary movement, when the single goal of overthrow is replaced by the complex landscape of governing. The benefit of the rough landscape is that it offers freedom and diverse versions of success. The risk is that no one really knows what is going on. It is difficult to build shared action or to come to shared agreement when no single goal or definition of success defines the problem space.

Strategies to move toward fitness are, of course, different depending on how you conceive of the landscape on which you travel. Two other factors serve to complicate matters even more. Many fitness landscapes change as agents move along them, so the measures of fitness change without warning. For example, a teenage boy wants a particular sneaker because everyone else wants them, but when everyone gets them, it is no longer a signal for success. The second factor that complicates this model/method is that various landscapes can be coupled, with each distorting the other in unpredictable ways. For example, if I am an ethical being, my personal landscape has a certain profile. If I work in an organization where financial success is the only goal, then my everyday behavior is a complex combination (a coupling) of my personal and my professional definitions of success.

The best way to make this model and method useful is to use it as one filter of meaning making and action taking in the midst of Adaptive Action.

What? are the current measures of success? How many and how high are the peaks of fitness? What are my personal choices for action, given the current landsacpe? What? are the current measures of success? How many and how high are the peaks of fitness? What are my personal choices for action, given the current landscape?
So what? are the options for my action? So what do I want to do to influence the landscape for myself and others? So what are the implications of this definition of fitness in the context of the larger or smaller environments?
Now what? can I do to move on the existing landscape? To explore additional landscapes? To reshape the landscape for myself and others?
about 2 years ago

Designing Exchanges

by Heather Oxman
Exchanges are how information and resources are shared. Effective exchanges increase fitness and sustainability because they increase the connections both among the agents in the system and between the system and the larger environment. The effectiveness of an exchange is determined by how well it serves its intended purpose. Those who understand and use HSD know the importance of carefully designing exchanges for greatest leverage. Exchanges are how information and resources are shared. Effective exchanges increase fitness and sustainability because they increase the connections both among the agents in the system and between the system and the larger environment. The effectiveness of an exchange is determined by how well it serves its intended purpose. Those who understand and use HSD know the importance of carefully designing exchanges for greatest leverage.

* *Length* – “distance” an exchange travels from giver to receiver; long exchanges limit direct response or explanation; are not intended for 1-1 interaction (newsletters, flyers, posters, commercials, etc.); short exchanges allow 1-1 engagement (email, phone, conversations, etc.)
* *Width* – “depth” of a message and its possible ambiguity; broad bands are heavy with information and ambiguity, requiring 1-1 or short exchanges; narrow bands are unambiguous; can be sent in newsletters and other one-way engagements.
* *Dynamic* – “impact” of an exchange; amplifying exchanges speed up or increase patterns (cheerleaders amplify the “fighting spirit”); damping exchanges decrease or eliminate patterns (negative feedback, punishment).
* *Direction* – “path” of an exchange; one-way or “feed forward” is broadcasting, as in messages that are shared from one to many others; two-way or “feedback” allows for mutual exchange and sharing, as in dialogue, conversation, and information gathering

You can find a webinar about designing exchanges at "Exchange: Design for Coordinated Action":http://www.hsdinstitute.org/books-resources/online-learning-and-products/online-learning.html.
about 2 years ago

Feedback Loops

by Heather Oxman
This special example of an exchange is a critical factor for sharing and/or bringing in new information. Its helpfulness lies in the ways it facilitates the effectiveness of any exchange. If we look at the model for [Design Exchanges], we can see how feedback loops can contribute to powerful exchanges.


  • Feedback loops are most effective when they are used in short loops, where information is exchanged in tightly coupled, time-limited loops.

  • Feedback loops also work best when they are facilitated in broad bands of exchange to allow for greater clarity as there is space to explain and respond to ambiguity and questions.

  • Exchanges can either flow one way or two ways, and the feedback loop is the two-way flow. Feedback sends signal into the system, and gathers information as those signals return. This is the sender-receiver cycle that is taught in Communications 101 classes, but often we forget to engage the second half of the loop. When we gather input for decision making, for instance, we often skip the critical step of letting people know how their input or feedback was used. This broken loop can lead to feelings of being isolate and marginalized.

  • Finally, feedback loops, when they are designed well, can be used to amplify the dynamics of an exchange by positive responses, encouragement, and other ways to rewarding or amplifying. On the other hand, feedback loops can also be used to damp the dynamics of an exchange by punishment or negative responses.
  • Exchanges can either flow one way or two ways, and the feedback loop is the two-way flow. Feedback sends one or more signals into the system, and gathers information as those signals return. This is the sender-receiver cycle that is taught in Communications 101 classes, but often we forget to engage the second half of the loop. When we gather input for decision making, for instance, we often skip the critical step of letting people know how their input or feedback was used. This broken loop can lead to feelings of being isolated and marginalized.

  • Finally, feedback loops, when they are designed well, can be used to amplify the dynamics of an exchange by giving positive responses, encouragement, and other ways of rewarding or amplifying. On the other hand, feedback loops can also be used to damp the dynamics of an exchange by punishment or negative responses.



Feedback loops enable system-wide transformation by feeding data back into the system for it to use to inform next decisions and actions. As the system works toward sustainability, it uses feedback to assess its progress and to adapt to internal and external changes and challenges.

Feedback loops contribute to coherence, adaptability, co-evolution, and learning at every scale in the system. Feedback loops contribute to coherence, adaptability, co-evolution, and learning, at every scale in the system.
about 2 years ago

Ethics as a Pattern of Behavior

by Heather Oxman
In HSD we agree that “ethics” are “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Additionally, Human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society. In HSD we agree that “ethics” are “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” For example, telling the truth and taking care of family are examples of moral principles that are important and describe aspects of ethical behavior in our culture. Additionally, human systems dynamics (HSD) tells us that principles of ethics emerge over space and time as people come together to live, work, and play. The ideas about how to live, work, and play become shared agreements that generate system-wide patterns. Those patterns, in turn, influence subsequent behavior of the individuals (see "CAS":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex_adaptive_system). What that means is that, as people come together and begin to form a “society,” they agree on what constitutes acceptable behavior and relationships. They then use those agreements as a foundation for rules and laws that inform future behavior of the society.

The reason these agreements are critical to a system is that they generate patterns of interaction that ensure the sustainability of the whole. When people agree about their code of ethical behavior, they commit to behave in coherent ways, behaving similarly across the system. They communicate their code to each other, building capacity of individuals and groups to understand and adhere to shared expectations. They establish constructs, like laws and rules, that inform individual and group behavior and connect groups to each other inside the system. Finally they use that common code to measure continuous adaptation and growth of individuals and groups toward system-wide ethical behavior. These patterns—commitment, communication, capacity building, coherence, constructs, connection, and continuous adaptation—emerge in society when individuals and groups live by shared agreements. The benefit is that the patterns also contribute to the ultimate sustainability of the whole system. The reason these agreements are critical to a system is that they generate patterns of interaction that ensure the sustainability of the whole. When people agree about their code of ethical behavior, they commit to behave in coherent ways, behaving similarly across the system. They communicate their code to each other, building capacity of individuals and groups to understand and adhere to shared expectations. They establish constructs, like laws and rules, that inform individual and group behavior and connect groups to each other inside the system. Finally, they use that common code to measure continuous adaptation and growth of individuals and groups toward system-wide ethical behavior. These patterns—commitment, communication, capacity building, coherence, constructs, connection, and continuous adaptation—emerge in society when individuals and groups live by shared agreements. The benefit is, that the patterns also contribute to the ultimate sustainability of the whole system.

People in the society promulgate their shared ethics by establishing rules that inform future behavior. Rules are codified to define the “law of the land.” Rules shape formal ethical codes for professional and social groups. Rules become the foundations for social mores that remain coherent, even as they vary slightly from one generation, family, or neighborhood to the next. The rules, or definitions of what constitute ethical behaviors, become the "strange attractor":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/attractor_patterns, setting the boundaries for activity, allowing individuals and groups to take specific and individual action within that boundary.
about 2 years ago

Difference Matrix

by Heather Oxman
The Difference Matrix describes the impact of exchange and difference in group interactions, using four quadrants.

* *Quadrant 1*- High Interaction/High Difference can run the gamut from energizing self-organization to out and out conflict
* *Quadrant 2* - High Interaction/Low Difference can be anything from noisy fun to raucous interactions of group think.
* *Quadrant 1* – Interaction/High Difference can run the gamut from energizing self-organization to out and out conflict
* *Quadrant 2* – Interaction/Low Difference can be anything from noisy fun to raucous interactions of group think.

* *Quadrant 3* – Low Interaction/High Difference allows for complete uncoupling to quiet reflection of differences.
* *Quadrant 4* – Low interaction/Low difference can be experienced as a continuum of a comfortable sharing of space to real boredom from lack of stimulation

You can also know how to shift a group from one quadrant to another.

* *To move up*, increase interaction and energy –use questions and stories * *To move up*, increase interaction and energy – use questions and stories
* *To move down*, decrease interaction and energy – reflect, separate, rest
* *To move left*, increase difference – identify difference, ask opinions
* *To move right*, decrease difference – identify similarities, create common group stories
about 2 years ago

Welcome

by Jeremy Lightsmith
No way!

Thanks for logging in! Poke around and learn about HSD!

h3. Want to edit pages?

If you would like to become an editor, please send an email to Glenda or Royce at the HSD Institute.

h3. Have a passcode?

If you've already talked to them, then you probably have a passcode. Enter it here.







about 2 years ago

Welcome

by Jeremy Lightsmith
No way!

Thanks for logging in! Poke around and learn about HSD!

h3. Want to edit pages?

If you would like to become an editor, please send an email to Glenda or Royce at the HSD Institute.

h3. Have a passcode?

If you've already talked to them, then you probably have a passcode. Enter it here.







about 2 years ago

Change the World

by Kristina Franek
Since mid-2010, each month we have shared a free resource that is based in HSD practice and theory (praxis). We have archived them here for your use. Please feel free to download them for your own purposes, remembering that our intellectual property policy offers this wide availability with only two requests. First we ask that you cite us as your source, and second that you feed new learning about the models back into the network.

(Please note: The topics are listed here by year and in alphabetical order and then attached below in order they were added to this site)

2010
* Conflict Circles
* Design Maps
* Strategic Adaptive Action
* Transforming Patterns

2011
* Adaptive Design
* Complex Adaptive Systems
* Complex or Complicated
* Ethics in HSD
* Evaluation in HSD
* Four Truths
* Inquiry
* Learning Triangle
* Partnerships or Partisanship
* Pattern Generating Questions
* STAR Diagram
* Sustainable Networks

2012
* Architectural Model
* Setting Conditions for System Change
* Coherence
* Difference Matrix
* Finite and Infinite Games
* Innovation and Replication
* Maturity Model
* Uncertainty

2013
* Adaptive Action Questions
* Employee Engagement
* Interdependent Pairs
* Joyful Practice
* Landscape Diagram
* Question Sorter
* Questions for Uncertainty
* Same and Different
* Share Your HSD Story
* True and Useful
* Teach and Learn
* Whole, Part, Greater Whole
* Value for Value

2014
* Change and Engagement
* Confidence Landscape
* Designing Exchanges
* Inquiry Landscape
* Kinds of Change
* Life Network Mapping
*Adaptive Coaching: Finding the Fit Response
*Four Principles of Change in Human Systems: Tension
*Four Principles of Change in Human Systems: Change at a Global Level
*Four Principles of Change: Simple Rules
*Four Principles of Change in Human Systems: Adaptive Action


2015
*Pattern-Based Communication Planning in Complex Systems
*Seeing a Continuum of Possibility
*Setting Conditions for Success
*Generating a Granting Voice: Creating Powerful Patterns of Communication



about 2 years ago

Change Management

by Heather Oxman
HSD supports complex change processes in diverse environments. These Live Virtual Webinars give a flavour of Change management ideas from HSD methods, models and thinking.

"http://breeze.uliveandlearn.com/p54194433/":http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Adaptability: Don’t Just React – Respond Oct - 2012 "http://breeze.uliveandlearn.com/p54194433/":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Adaptability: Don’t Just React – Respond Oct - 2012

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p9bd88hk85z/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Planning When You Can’t: Understanding Three Types of Change - August 2013 "http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p9bd88hk85z/":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Planning When You Can’t: Understanding Three Types of Change - August 2013

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p7u73k0kzry/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Moving Forward in Complexity: Strategy for the 21st Century - "http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p7u73k0kzry/":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Moving Forward in Complexity: Strategy for the 21st Century -
October 2013

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p2pipzs82q5/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Agile Organizations: Setting Conditions for Self-Organizing - April 2014 "http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p2pipzs82q5/":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Agile Organizations: Setting Conditions for Self-Organizing - April 2014

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity - March 2015 "http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity - March 2015
about 2 years ago

Change Management

by Heather Oxman
HSD supports complex change processes in diverse environments. HSD supports complex change processes in diverse environments. These Live Virtual Webinars give a flavour of Change management ideas from HSD methods, models and thinking.

"http://breeze.uliveandlearn.com/p54194433/":http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Adaptability: Don’t Just React – Respond Oct - 2012

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p9bd88hk85z/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Planning When You Can’t: Understanding Three Types of Change - August 2013

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p7u73k0kzry/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Moving Forward in Complexity: Strategy for the 21st Century -
October 2013

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p2pipzs82q5/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Agile Organizations: Setting Conditions for Self-Organizing - April 2014

"http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/"http:wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity - March 2015
about 2 years ago

CDE

by Heather Oxman
The Eoyang CDE describes the three '''conditions''' that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research about and with organizations. The three conditions, elegantly simple, are brief and powerful. The Eoyang CDE describes the three conditions that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research about and with organizations. The three conditions, elegantly simple, are brief and powerful.

'''The Container''' bounds the system until patterns can begin to form. Containers form the boundaries between one system and another (see "Boundaries":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/boundaries). The Container bounds the system until patterns can begin to form. Containers form the boundaries between one system and another (see "Boundaries":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/boundaries).

'''Differences''' represent significant diversities in the system, and are the points of emergence and change in a system. Differences represent significant diversities in the system, and are the points of emergence and change in a system.

'''Exchanges''' allow for movement of information and other resources across a system and between the system and its environment (see "Designing Exchanges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/designingexchanges). Exchanges allow for movement of information and other resources across a system and between the system and its environment (see "Designing Exchanges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/designingexchanges).


Because we understand the dynamics at work when these conditions shape the self-organization that generates patterns in a system, we can take informed action to shift the conditions and shape the emergence of new patterns.

'''Containers''' can be concrete realities in the system, such as the physical location or space. They can also be concepts and ideas that draw people together. Meeting agendas, for example, create a boundary that shapes the patterns of flow and productivity in the meeting. Short agendas force quicker decision-making and less discussion. Longer agendas allow for greater exploration of the differences in a system. Smaller containers generally speed up the emergence of patterns, larger containers allow more richness in those patterns. Rock stars or powerful political leaders are "conceptual" containers in that people are drawn to and influenced by them. Political or social ideology can become conceptual containers. Finally there are psychological, or affinity, containers--age, gender, personal bias, shared history, family ties, background and so on--that serve to bind individuals into identifiable groups.

'''Difference''' in the system allows for change as the agents negotiate and accommodate the diversities that separate them. While a highly diverse system usually has too many differences to count, the important shifts will happen around those differences that are most critical to the system's overall functioning. For instance, there may be ten people in a training room; each one a unique and special human being. If you tried to deal with all the differences inside that training container, you would not be able to name them, much less consider the impact of all those differences on the whole. On the other hand, in that training session, the degree of skill, understanding and difference in role (teacher or student) will establish patterns of interaction that could dominate the learning session. Or, difference may be represented by the kind of diversity that's present: leadership skills vs accounting skills; or it may be represented by degree of diversity: more or less experience in a given job. Increasing, decreasing, or introducing new differences will shift the conditions and change the emergent patterns in a system. Looking at the differences that make a difference in the system is a key aspect of CDE.

The third condition, '''exchanges''', refers to how agents in a system connect among themselves and/or how the system connects to the greater environment. Exchanges can be accomplished through typical, traditional human interaction; they can be the rules and regulations that inform decisions; resources such as money, goods, and time that represent value in a system; or what happens in the times agents share, such as play, relationships, or work. Any of these provide connections that shape the patterns of our existence, and shifting exchanges will bring about change in the system.

Because the three conditions are massively entangled with each other, it is only necessary to shift one condition to bring about change in the other two. For example, when I make a container smaller, generally the differences become more significant, and the exchanges happen faster. It is critical to remember, however, that, while you can anticipate the change you might trigger, you can neither predict nor control just what that change will be. HSD practitioners and professionals who use the CDE model to help them understand and influence the dynamics of their systems use "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptiveaction to enable them to respond appropriately when unexpected consequences arise. Because the three conditions are massively entangled with each other, it is only necessary to shift one condition to bring about change in the other two. For example, when I make a container smaller, generally the differences become more significant, and the exchanges happen faster. It is critical to remember, however, that, while you can anticipate the change you might trigger, you can neither predict nor control just what that change will be. HSD practitioners and professionals who use the CDE model to help them understand and influence the dynamics of their systems use "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptiveaction to enable them to respond appropriately when unexpected consequences arise.
about 2 years ago

Live Virtual Workshops, 2015

by Kristina Franek
The monthly live virtual workshops about the power of Human Systems Dynamics and Adaptive Action continue into 2015. Each month, Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, shares insights and perspectives about applying HSD in a number of areas. Once each quarter we invite HSD Associates to share their work and insights about using Adaptive Action.

EVENT? — See the schedule below

TIMES? — All times are 11am – 12noon (Central Time) – Except the Quarterly Meetings in March, June, September, and December, which are scheduled to last 2 hours: 11am – 1pm (Central Time)

COST? — FREE

Registration? — For all sessions, "Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

Schedule


*--May 7, 2015*
*_Healing Healthcare: Our Shared Future_*
_Make choices that support health and wellbeing for yourself, your family, team, organization, and community today and for years to come._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 4, 2015*
*_Leadership for the 22nd Century: Taking Action Today_*
_Not science fiction, but science fact: today’s leadership shapes tomorrow’s world. What are today’s leadership behaviors that support successful and sustainable futures?_
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 18m 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--July, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--August 6, 2015*
*_Change Is an Art: The Esthetics of Organizational Life_*
_The line between science and art fade away in the HSD world of patterns and adaptive action. Create energy and coherence for change for you and your organization._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 3, 2015*
*_Beyond Alignment: Simple Rules for Coherence in Chaos_*
_Two things ensure success in chaotic times. Similarity gives stability, and difference gives potential. Coherence—especially in chaotic times—demands that everyone balance similarity and difference for themselves. Simple rules tell them how. _
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--October 8, 2015*
*_Heterarchy: Change in the Fast Lane_*
_Learn to inspire and influence change that begins in every point and moves in all directions. Action from the top-down, bottom-up, and everything in between sets conditions for adaptive emergence for people, process, and policy._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--November 5, 2015*
*_Adaptive Action Comes Home: Integrating Emotional Knowing_*
_Tension moves us to action. Intellectual, social, emotional, physical—any source of tension creates the opportunity and impetus for change. Learn how to integrate all of these energies into powerful decision making and action taking._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 3, 2015*
*Aging: The complex patterns of personal change*
_Three HSD tools help you keep your balance through personal transitions, as old powers fade._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--Archives:* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*--January, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--February 5, 2015*
*_Peace is a Pattern: Adaptive Action and Conflict_*
_What fundamental assumptions sustain conflict? What alternatives can HSD offer for seeing conflict in new ways? How can it help us imagine opportunities for peace? What would it mean to take effective Adaptive Action to shift patterns toward health and wellbeing for people, families, and communities? Join this inquiry and move toward your own Adaptive Action for peace and justice._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p285m707354/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 5, 2015*
*_Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity_*
_Adapt your strategies to be most fit for function. Know when to innovate for emergent opportunities and when to replicate for reliable performance._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 19, 2015*
*_Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives. *_Quarterly meeting_*
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p74ol4zgu2b/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--April 2, 2015*
*_Through the Looking Glass: The Altered Reality of HSD_*
_Explore an alternative science and join an alternative practice to find breakthrough solutions to the most sticky issues. 19th Century theory and 20th Century practice keep us stuck in our 21st Century problems. Until we think about reality differently, we will not act differently. Until we act differently, we will not solve our most difficult problems. Step through the HSD looking glass to see in surprising ways, imagine innovations, and take Adaptive Action._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p8ftsrlgb42/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

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