Changes

almost 2 years ago

Live Virtual Workshops, 2015

by Kristina Franek
The monthly live virtual workshops about the power of Human Systems Dynamics and Adaptive Action continue into 2015. Each month, Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, shares insights and perspectives about applying HSD in a number of areas. Once each quarter we invite HSD Associates to share their work and insights about using Adaptive Action.

EVENT? — See the schedule below

TIMES? — All times are 11am – 12noon (Central Time) – Except the Quarterly Meetings in March, June, September, and December, which are scheduled to last 2 hours: 11am – 1pm (Central Time)

COST? — FREE

Registration? — For all sessions, "Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

Schedule


*--May 7, 2015*
*_Healing Healthcare: Our Shared Future_*
_Make choices that support health and wellbeing for yourself, your family, team, organization, and community today and for years to come._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 4, 2015*
*_Leadership for the 22nd Century: Taking Action Today_*
_Not science fiction, but science fact: today’s leadership shapes tomorrow’s world. What are today’s leadership behaviors that support successful and sustainable futures?_
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 18m 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--July, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--August 6, 2015*
*_Change Is an Art: The Esthetics of Organizational Life_*
_The line between science and art fade away in the HSD world of patterns and adaptive action. Create energy and coherence for change for you and your organization._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 3, 2015*
*_Beyond Alignment: Simple Rules for Coherence in Chaos_*
_Two things ensure success in chaotic times. Similarity gives stability, and difference gives potential. Coherence—especially in chaotic times—demands that everyone balance similarity and difference for themselves. Simple rules tell them how. _
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--October 8, 2015*
*_Heterarchy: Change in the Fast Lane_*
_Learn to inspire and influence change that begins in every point and moves in all directions. Action from the top-down, bottom-up, and everything in between sets conditions for adaptive emergence for people, process, and policy._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--November 5, 2015*
*_Adaptive Action Comes Home: Integrating Emotional Knowing_*
_Tension moves us to action. Intellectual, social, emotional, physical—any source of tension creates the opportunity and impetus for change. Learn how to integrate all of these energies into powerful decision making and action taking._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 3, 2015*
*Aging: The complex patterns of personal change*
_Three HSD tools help you keep your balance through personal transitions, as old powers fade._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--Archives:* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*--January, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--February 5, 2015*
*_Peace is a Pattern: Adaptive Action and Conflict_*
_What fundamental assumptions sustain conflict? What alternatives can HSD offer for seeing conflict in new ways? How can it help us imagine opportunities for peace? What would it mean to take effective Adaptive Action to shift patterns toward health and wellbeing for people, families, and communities? Join this inquiry and move toward your own Adaptive Action for peace and justice._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p285m707354/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 5, 2015*
*_Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity_*
_Adapt your strategies to be most fit for function. Know when to innovate for emergent opportunities and when to replicate for reliable performance._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 19, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--April 2, 2015*
*_Through the Looking Glass: The Altered Reality of HSD_*
_Explore an alternative science and join an alternative practice to find breakthrough solutions to the most sticky issues. 19th Century theory and 20th Century practice keep us stuck in our 21st Century problems. Until we think about reality differently, we will not act differently. Until we act differently, we will not solve our most difficult problems. Step through the HSD looking glass to see in surprising ways, imagine innovations, and take Adaptive Action._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--May 7, 2015*
*_Healing Healthcare: Our Shared Future_*
_Make choices that support health and wellbeing for yourself, your family, team, organization, and community today and for years to come._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 4, 2015*
*_Leadership for the 22nd Century: Taking Action Today_*
_Not science fiction, but science fact: today’s leadership shapes tomorrow’s world. What are today’s leadership behaviors that support successful and sustainable futures?_
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 18m 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--July, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--August 6, 2015*
*_Change Is an Art: The Esthetics of Organizational Life_*
_The line between science and art fade away in the HSD world of patterns and adaptive action. Create energy and coherence for change for you and your organization._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 3, 2015*
*_Beyond Alignment: Simple Rules for Coherence in Chaos_*
_Two things ensure success in chaotic times. Similarity gives stability, and difference gives potential. Coherence—especially in chaotic times—demands that everyone balance similarity and difference for themselves. Simple rules tell them how. _
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--October 8, 2015*
*_Heterarchy: Change in the Fast Lane_*
_Learn to inspire and influence change that begins in every point and moves in all directions. Action from the top-down, bottom-up, and everything in between sets conditions for adaptive emergence for people, process, and policy._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--November 5, 2015*
*_Adaptive Action Comes Home: Integrating Emotional Knowing_*
_Tension moves us to action. Intellectual, social, emotional, physical—any source of tension creates the opportunity and impetus for change. Learn how to integrate all of these energies into powerful decision making and action taking._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 3, 2015*
*Aging: The complex patterns of personal change*
_Three HSD tools help you keep your balance through personal transitions, as old powers fade._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--Archives:* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*--January, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--February 5, 2015*
*_Peace is a Pattern: Adaptive Action and Conflict_*
_What fundamental assumptions sustain conflict? What alternatives can HSD offer for seeing conflict in new ways? How can it help us imagine opportunities for peace? What would it mean to take effective Adaptive Action to shift patterns toward health and wellbeing for people, families, and communities? Join this inquiry and move toward your own Adaptive Action for peace and justice._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p285m707354/
*_Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p74ol4zgu2b/

For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 5, 2015*
*_Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity_*
_Adapt your strategies to be most fit for function. Know when to innovate for emergent opportunities and when to replicate for reliable performance._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/
*--April 2, 2015*
*_Through the Looking Glass: The Altered Reality of HSD_*
_Explore an alternative science and join an alternative practice to find breakthrough solutions to the most sticky issues. 19th Century theory and 20th Century practice keep us stuck in our 21st Century problems. Until we think about reality differently, we will not act differently. Until we act differently, we will not solve our most difficult problems. Step through the HSD looking glass to see in surprising ways, imagine innovations, and take Adaptive Action._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p8ftsrlgb42/

For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

Archives
almost 2 years ago

Coupling

by Heather Oxman
Coupling refers to how a system connects to itself and its greater environment to share information and other resources. Individuals connect with each other—parts connect with each other—the system connects with other systems like it—the system connects with the greater environment. Coupling refers to how a system connects to itself and its greater environment to share information and other resources. Agents connect with each other: individual parts connect with each other; the system connects with other systems like it, and; the system connects with the greater environment.

We can think about coupling as the ways in which humans connect to each other and to the information they need to do their work—supervision, feedback loops, data and information, resource sharing, and shared cultures are a few examples. We can think about coupling as the ways in which humans connect to each other and to the information they need to do their work—supervision, feedback loops, data and information, resource sharing, and shared cultures are but a few examples.

The term "coupling" can also refer to how tightly linked or coordinated different phenomenon are in a system. It expresses a measurement of the degree of interdependence among the parts of the system. The term "coupling" can also refer to how tightly linked, or coordinated, different phenomenon are in a system. It expresses a measurement of the degree of interdependence among the parts of the system.

Three levels of coupling occur, with any degree of connection possible along a continuum along all three:
* *Tight Couples* – allow close, fast exchanges of information and resources; movement in one part triggers immediate and similar movement in the other _(holding hands, direct supervision, lock-step benchmarking, high levels of interdependence, and close correlation of action and impact, etc.)_
Three levels of coupling occur, with any degree of connection possible along a continuum, in all three:
* *Tight Couples* – allow close, fast exchanges of information and resources; movement in one part triggers immediate and similar movement in the other: ''holding hands, direct supervision, lock-step benchmarking, high levels of interdependence, and close correlation of action and impact, etc.''


* *Loose Couples* – allow greater freedom of movement, while still remaining connected; movement in one triggers response, but not necessarily immediate or similar _(eye contact, periodic feedback, general performance comparisons, lower levels of interdependence, and less obvious connections between action and impact, etc.)_ * *Loose Couples* – allow greater freedom of movement, while still remaining connected; movement in one triggers response, but not necessarily immediate or similar movement: ''eye contact, periodic feedback, general performance comparisons, lower levels of interdependence, and less obvious connections between action and impact, etc.''

* *Uncoupling* – complete disconnect with no sharing of resources _(ending a relationship, physically moving away, total independence, and no connection between action and impact, etc.)_* *Uncoupling* – complete disconnect with no sharing of resources: ''ending a relationship, physically moving away, total independence, and no connection between action and impact, etc.''
almost 2 years ago

Constraints

by Heather Oxman
Constraints are limitations or restrictions that emerge from within a system. Also known as "degrees of freedom," this is about the degree to which expectations, policies, processes, interactions, and relationships from inside the system allow members to make choices about their own individual and group actions and behaviors. Constraints emerge in a system as a way to manage the "chaos" and uncertainty that exists, and shape the path of self-organization and the emergence of patterns across the system. Constraints influence patterns by shifting the speed, path, and direction of self-organization. If you want to change patterns of self-organization, you would either find ways to constrain the system more—make expectations more specific—or to decrease constraints—decrease specificity. Constraints are limitations or restrictions that emerge from within a system. Also known as "degrees of freedom," this is about the degree to which expectations, policies, processes, interactions, and relationships from inside the system allow agents to make choices about their own individual and group actions and behaviors. Constraints emerge in a system as a way to manage the "chaos" and uncertainty that exists, and shape the path of self-organization and the emergence of patterns across the system. Constraints influence patterns by shifting the speed, path, and direction of self-organization. If you want to change patterns of self-organization, you would either find ways to constrain the system more—make expectations more specific—or to decrease constraints—decrease specificity.

The "Landscape Diagram":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/landscape_diagram offers a "map" for how constraints can shape relationships and action in a complex adaptive system. If constraints serve to increase agreement and certainty, their emergence will shift a system from upper right (unstable) to lower left (stable) on the diagram. Think about the emergence of a new product. Research folks explore new trends and possibilities (unstable, upper right) until they can begin to see some patterns begin to emerge. The concept then shows up in the emergent space, where the patterns become clearer and developers define and describe the new product. Ultimately the developers create specifications for manufacturing staff, who pull the process down into the lower left into production procedures and processes that are close to agreement and close to certainty. Say that over time, new technology or a design flaw requires that the product be re-examined. Manufacturing folks give the product back to development folks who bring in new ideas from the research folks to refine their design, create new specifications and send it back to manufacturing for continued production. The same general cycle describes the emergence of any pattern in human systems--products, poetry, rules and regulations, relationships, new ideas and concepts. Constraints from inside the system shape this path of emergence at all scales.

We think of constraints in one of three ways.

A system is Ideally Constrained when it has appropriate freedom to respond in coherent and productive ways.
A system is Overly Constrained when it is held too tightly, causing turbulence as parts of the system compete for limited time, space, and resources.
A system is Under Constrained when it is not held tightly enough, causing turbulence as parts of the system lose energy and productivity.

There is no pre-set level of constraint that a system "seeks" or that we can set as a benchmark for all similar systems. Acceptable degrees of freedom or appropriate levels of constraint are about fitness of the system in its immediate internal and external environments. A system that is ideally constrained is able to function productively, engaging in self-organizing and adaptive behavior that allows it the freedom to find the best "fit" in the greater environment. When a system is unable to find that level of fitness, conflict emerges and the sustainability of the system is in jeopardy.
almost 2 years ago

Complex Adaptive System

by Heather Oxman
A complex adaptive system (CAS) is defined as “a group of semi-autonomous agents who interact in interdependent ways to produce system-wide patterns, such that those patterns then influence behavior of the agents.” (Dooley, 1996)

In human systems, each agent (person, groups of people and/or clusters of groups) can make their own choices about when and how they interact. Whatever these interactions are, over time some interactions of agents will be more frequently occurring than others, generating system-wide patterns of behavior that come to characterize that system. Subsequently those patterns will then reinforce the behaviors of the individual agents, which serves to strengthen the patterns.

We call these predominant patterns that influence agent behavior “culture.” Whether it is the culture of an organization, a group of people or a family, the patterns of expectations and decision making become characteristic of that particular group. Ultimately behavior is influenced by those patterns, as people try to “fit in” the existing culture. Think about the cultural differences that exist between faith communities, between ethnic groups, between local practices within a larger community. Set patterns of behavior characterize these cultures, and those patterns reward individuals who participate in them and damp the behaviors of those who do not.

Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative) Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative_Engagement)

Some patterns are more productive than others, when considering sustainability and fitness. What helps someone reduce tension (find fitness) with their nearest neighbors in the system might increase tension (decrease fitness) with their greater community. For example, the behavior in a street gang is highly regimented, with clear expectations, hierarchies, and roles. To sustain participation (reduce or resolve tension) in such a culture often requires behaviors that put the street gang members at odds with the larger community, as manifested in turf wars, violence, and legal issues. Individuals and groups have to negotiate and navigate these differences in the ways that seem most accessible to them at any given moment.

Because cultural patterns are self-reinforcing, to change the “culture” requires individuals to change their behaviors on such a scale that they can influence existing patterns—amplifying those patterns they find productive, and damping patterns they find non-productive. This is an ongoing and difficult challenge as individuals seek to shift shared expectations and agreements and generate new patterns.
almost 2 years ago

Conflict Circles

by Heather Oxman
Any conflict carries with it a unique set of stories. First is the “story” of what really happened—”Just the facts, ma’am.” Then there are the “stories” of each individual who might be involved. The individual, personal stories are based in interpretations, experiences, emotions, and understandings, and may vary widely across those engaged in the conflict. Any conflict carries with it a unique set of stories. First is the “story” of what really happened—”Just the facts, ma’am.” Then there are the “stories” of each individual who might be involved. The personal, individual stories are based in interpretations, experiences, emotions, and understandings, and may vary widely across those engaged in the conflict.

One very useful tool for resolving conflicts comes to us from the Landmark Forum. As a model, the conflict circles help us to see that there are multiple stories about any given event or issues. As a method, the conflict circles open a process where participants reflect on and document the existing stories from their own perspectives—what really happened in fact and each individual’s personal story about what really happened. When we compare our personal stories, we often find different interpretations cause the conflict, more than the event itself. In any conflict, each individual is more likely to believe and live out his or her own interpretation, without questioning or exploring other possible reasons for observed behavior.

Unbraiding the conflict in this way allows those who are involved to sort out the facts and find long-term resolution.Unbraiding the conflict in this way allows those who are involved to sort out the facts and find long-term resolution.
almost 2 years ago

Complex Adaptive System

by Heather Oxman
A complex adaptive system (CAS) is defined as “a group of semi-autonomous agents who interact in interdependent ways to produce system-wide patterns, such that those patterns then influence behavior of the agents.” (Dooley, 1996)

In human systems, each agent (person, groups of people and/or clusters of groups) can make their own choices about when and how they interact. Whatever these interactions are, over time some interactions of agents will be more frequently occurring than others, generating system-wide patterns of behavior that come to characterize that system. Subsequently those patterns will then reinforce the behaviors of the individual agents, which serves to strengthen the patterns.

We call these predominant patterns that influence agent behavior “culture.” Whether it is the culture of an organization, a group of people or a family, the patterns of expectations and decision making become characteristic of that particular group. Ultimately behavior is influenced by those patterns, as people try to “fit in” the existing culture. Think about the cultural differences that exist between faith communities, between ethnic groups, between local practices within a larger community. Set patterns of behavior characterize these cultures, and those patterns reward individuals who participate in them and damp the behaviors of those who do not.

Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative Engagement) Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative)

Some patterns are more productive than others, when considering sustainability and fitness. What helps someone reduce tension (find fitness) with their nearest neighbors in the system might increase tension (decrease fitness) with their greater community. For example, the behavior in a street gang is highly regimented, with clear expectations, hierarchies, and roles. To sustain participation (reduce or resolve tension) in such a culture often requires behaviors that put the street gang members at odds with the larger community, as manifested in turf wars, violence, and legal issues. Individuals and groups have to negotiate and navigate these differences in the ways that seem most accessible to them at any given moment.

Because cultural patterns are self-reinforcing, to change the “culture” requires individuals to change their behaviors on such a scale that they can influence existing patterns—amplifying those patterns they find productive, and damping patterns they find non-productive. This is an ongoing and difficult challenge as individuals seek to shift shared expectations and agreements and generate new patterns.
almost 2 years ago

Complex Adaptive System

by Heather Oxman
A complex adaptive system (CAS) is defined as “a group of semi-autonomous agents who interact in interdependent ways to produce system-wide patterns, such that those patterns then influence behavior of the agents.” (Dooley, 1996)

In human systems, each agent (person, groups of people and/or clusters of groups) can make their own choices about when and how they interact. Whatever these interactions are, over time some interactions of agents will be more frequently occurring than others, generating system-wide patterns of behavior that come to characterize that system. Subsequently those patterns will then reinforce the behaviors of the individual agents, which serves to strengthen the patterns.

We call these predominant patterns that influence agent behavior “culture.” Whether it is the culture of an organization, a group of people or a family, the patterns of expectations and decision making become characteristic of that particular group. Ultimately behavior is influenced by those patterns, as people try to “fit in” the existing culture. Think about the cultural differences that exist between faith communities, between ethnic groups, between local practices within a larger community. Set patterns of behavior characterize these cultures, and those patterns reward individuals who participate in them and damp the behaviors of those who do not.

Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement"http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative Engagement) Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative Engagement)

Some patterns are more productive than others, when considering sustainability and fitness. What helps someone reduce tension (find fitness) with their nearest neighbors in the system might increase tension (decrease fitness) with their greater community. For example, the behavior in a street gang is highly regimented, with clear expectations, hierarchies, and roles. To sustain participation (reduce or resolve tension) in such a culture often requires behaviors that put the street gang members at odds with the larger community, as manifested in turf wars, violence, and legal issues. Individuals and groups have to negotiate and navigate these differences in the ways that seem most accessible to them at any given moment.

Because cultural patterns are self-reinforcing, to change the “culture” requires individuals to change their behaviors on such a scale that they can influence existing patterns—amplifying those patterns they find productive, and damping patterns they find non-productive. This is an ongoing and difficult challenge as individuals seek to shift shared expectations and agreements and generate new patterns.
almost 2 years ago

Complex Adaptive System

by Heather Oxman
A complex adaptive system (CAS) is defined as “a group of semi-autonomous agents who interact in interdependent ways to produce system-wide patterns, such that those patterns then influence behavior of the agents.” (Dooley, 1996)

What this means is that in human systems, individuals can make their own choices about when and how they interact. Whatever these interactions are, over time some interactions will be more frequently occurring than others, generating system-wide patterns of behavior that come to characterize that system. Subsequently those patterns will then reinforce the behaviors of the individual agents, which serves to strengthen the patterns. In human systems, each agent (person, groups of people and/or clusters of groups) can make their own choices about when and how they interact. Whatever these interactions are, over time some interactions of agents will be more frequently occurring than others, generating system-wide patterns of behavior that come to characterize that system. Subsequently those patterns will then reinforce the behaviors of the individual agents, which serves to strengthen the patterns.

We call these predominant patterns that influence agent behavior “culture.” Whether it is the culture of an organization, a group of people or a family, the patterns of expectations and decision making become characteristic of that particular group. Ultimately individual behavior is influenced by those patterns as people try to “fit in” the existing culture. Think about the cultural differences that exist between faith communities, between ethnic groups, between local practices within a larger community. Set patterns of behavior characterize these cultures, and those patterns reward individuals who participate in them and damp the behaviors of those who do not. We call these predominant patterns that influence agent behavior “culture.” Whether it is the culture of an organization, a group of people or a family, the patterns of expectations and decision making become characteristic of that particular group. Ultimately behavior is influenced by those patterns, as people try to “fit in” the existing culture. Think about the cultural differences that exist between faith communities, between ethnic groups, between local practices within a larger community. Set patterns of behavior characterize these cultures, and those patterns reward individuals who participate in them and damp the behaviors of those who do not.

Patterns emerge as individuals seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. Patterns emerge as agents seek to sustain the system, building coherence across the whole by adapting to the challenges in the greater environment and by adapting to internal needs among the members of the group. Culture emerges as a group agrees (either explicitly or implicitly) and acts on their shared identity, on what's important to them, and on how they will connect. (see "Generative Engagement"http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Generative Engagement)

Some patterns are more productive than others, when considering sustainability and fitness. What helps me reduce tension (find fitness) with my nearest neighbors in the system might increase tension (decrease fitness) with the greater community. For example, the behavior in a street gang is highly regimented, with clear expectations, hierarchies, and roles. To sustain participation (reduce or resolve tension) in such a culture often requires behaviors that put the street gang members at odds with the larger community, as manifested in turf wars, violence, and legal issues. Individuals and groups have to negotiate and navigate these differences in the ways that seem most accessible to them at any given moment. Some patterns are more productive than others, when considering sustainability and fitness. What helps someone reduce tension (find fitness) with their nearest neighbors in the system might increase tension (decrease fitness) with their greater community. For example, the behavior in a street gang is highly regimented, with clear expectations, hierarchies, and roles. To sustain participation (reduce or resolve tension) in such a culture often requires behaviors that put the street gang members at odds with the larger community, as manifested in turf wars, violence, and legal issues. Individuals and groups have to negotiate and navigate these differences in the ways that seem most accessible to them at any given moment.

Because cultural patterns are self-reinforcing, to change the “culture” requires individuals to change their behaviors on such a scale that they can influence existing patterns—amplifying those patterns they find productive, and damping patterns they find non-productive. This is an ongoing and difficult challenge as individuals seek to shift shared expectations and agreements and generate new patterns. Because cultural patterns are self-reinforcing, to change the “culture” requires individuals to change their behaviors on such a scale that they can influence existing patterns—amplifying those patterns they find productive, and damping patterns they find non-productive. This is an ongoing and difficult challenge as individuals seek to shift shared expectations and agreements and generate new patterns.
almost 2 years ago

Coherence

by Heather Oxman
Coherence is the degree to which parts of a system “fit” each other or the external environment, and it is a necessary factor in sustainability. We often think of coherence as the degree of similarity, thinking that the more similar we are the better off we will be. Actually, that's not exactly right, and a more rigorous understanding of coherence serves more effectively. Dictionary.com offers one definition of coherence as "the quality of being logical and consistent; of forming a unified whole." When we say coherence is the degree of fitness among the parts of a system, that's what we mean. the parts work together in logical and consistent ways to create a unified and complete system. They make sense together. There is enough similarity that they can work together well, but enough difference that they are not unnecessarily redundant. Coherence is the degree to which parts of a system “fit” each other or the external environment, and it is a necessary factor in sustainability. We often think of coherence as the degree of similarity, thinking that the more similar we are, the better off we will be. Actually, that's not exactly right, and a more rigorous understanding of coherence serves us more effectively. One definition of coherence as ''the quality of being logical and consistent; of forming a unified whole.'' When we say coherence is the degree of fitness among the parts of a system, that's what we mean. the parts work together in logical and consistent ways to create a unified and complete system. They make sense together. There is enough similarity that they can work together well, but enough difference that they are not unnecessarily redundant.

What do we mean when we say that patterns across a system are coherent? We mean that people don't have to rely on codified answers to every situation. They function from a shared framework of understanding and decision making that informs decisions similarly from moment to moment and from place to place. From an HSD perspective, what are some principles that increase coherence in a system? What do we mean when we say that patterns across a system are coherent? We mean that people don't have to rely on standard answers to every situation. They function from a shared framework of understanding and decision making that informs decisions similarly from moment to moment and from place to place. From an HSD perspective, what are some principles that increase coherence in a system?

1. Inquiry - When individuals and groups stand in inquiry, they are better able to see and understand the reality of their environments rather than act on their own individual assumptions. They stand open to the possibility that is in a situation and can see options for creating the best "fit" response.

2. Patterns - Individuals who understand the underlying dynamics of the systems where they live and work have the capacity to see, understand, and influence patterns. When they have that basic capacity, they have less need to rely on codified answers and black-and-white decisions. They can take action that build similarity across the whole, without everything having to look exactly the same. 2. Patterns - Individuals understand the underlying dynamics of the systems where they live and work have the capacity to see, understand, and influence patterns. When they have that basic capacity, they have less need to rely on standard answers and black-and-white decisions. They can take action that build similarity across the whole, without everything having to look exactly the same.

3. Simple Rules - Simple rules, or "minimum specifications," inform action and decision making that shape the dominant patterns in a complex adaptive system. In human systems they are the shared expectations or agreements (sometimes explicit; sometimes implicit) that are common across the group. When people use a shared set of simple rules, they generate shared patterns of decision making and interaction that come to characterize their group.

In our work with systems, we have identified seven characteristics that serve as indicators of coherence. Each characteristic can describe a continuum
of possibility—from dysfunctional randomness to dysfunctional similarity. Systems seek the middle range of each, allowing for optimal responsiveness and adaptability. These basic definitions of each of the characteristics are more fully explored in the attachment, which offers a tool you can use to explore and discuss the coherence you find in your organization or system.
In our work with systems, we have identified seven characteristics that serve as indicators of coherence. Each characteristic can describe a continuum of possibility—from dysfunctional randomness to dysfunctional similarity. Systems seek the middle range of each, allowing for optimal responsiveness and adaptability. The basic definitions of each of these characteristics are more fully explored in the attachment, which offers a tool you can use to explore and discuss the coherence you find in your organization or system.

- Shared Goals := parts of the system work toward similar targets
- Repeated Patterns := system-wide interactions generate similar patterns across time and space
- Shared Meaning := data is interpreted similarly across the system
- Internal and External Adaptation := system responds productively to internal and external changes and challenges
- Conserved Energy := resources are not wasted across the system
- Complementary Functions := parts contribute to each other and to overall system-wide functioning
- Reduced Internal Tension := parts work together well, reducing tension and discord across the system
- Shared Goals := parts of the system working toward similar targets.
- Repeated Patterns := system-wide interactions generating similar patterns across time and space.
- Shared Meaning := data is being interpreted similarly across the system.
- Internal and External Adaptation := system responding productively to internal and external changes and challenges.
- Conserved Energy := resources are not being wasted across the system.
- Complementary Functions := parts contributing to each other and to overall system-wide functioning.
- Reduced Internal Tension := parts are working together well, reducing tension and discord across the system.
almost 2 years ago

Coevolution

by Heather Oxman
In a CAS, the parts of the system are massively entangled, such that changes in one part bring about similar changes in other parts. Growth and development of one part of the system are dependent on the growth and development of other parts of the system. This is the essence of co-evolution in human systems. In a CAS, the parts of the system are massively entangled, such that changes in one part of the system bring about similar changes in other parts. Growth and development of one part of the system are dependent on the growth and development of other parts of the system. This is the essence of co-evolution in human systems.

People learn together and from each other as they adapt to interpersonal and environmental conditions of the system. They self-organize, resulting in all parts being changed in ways that move the system toward greater coherence internally and between its internal and external environments. When a system is unable to coevolve, it experiences turbulence and conflict as it attempts to resolve and/or negotiate across emergent differences. People learn together and from each other, as they adapt to interpersonal and environmental conditions of the system. They self-organize, resulting in all parts being changed in ways that move the system toward greater '''coherence''' internally and between its internal and external environments. When a system is unable to coevolve, it experiences turbulence and conflict as it attempts to resolve and/or negotiate across emergent differences.

A simple matrix model (image attached) can help track and troubleshoot co-evolutionary relationships.
almost 2 years ago

Develop Board Capacity

by Heather Oxman
Boards of Directors are made up of individuals who come together from unique backgrounds that shape their individual expectations and perspectives about their roles, about the purpose of their organization, and about expectations for their own participation in governing that organization. Too often, they have little or no real training in understanding the complex nature of the systems they are selected to govern, they don’t fully understand the potential impact of decisions they make, and there is lack of agreement among board members about the role the board is to play.
We believe the role of any governing board is to engage in Adaptive Action to shape the patterns of interaction and decision making that will move their organization toward its mission and goals. And they must do that by focusing not on operational and day-to-day activities and interactions, but by understanding the dynamics of the landscape internal and external to the organization and establishing policies and expectations that will set conditions for productive, sustainable patterns across the whole.
Toward that end we have explored five fitness landscapes that frame the environment of leaders in a system:
1. Social – The human context of interactions and relationships
2. Work – The productivity context of skills and abilities, roles and responsibilities
3. Institutional – The organizational context in which the work is done
4. Personal – The context of individual emotional, psychological, and physical health
5. Ethical – The context of decision making that contributes to the good at all scales
Boards of Directors come together to govern an organization. The directors, sometimes volunteers, are individuals with unique backgrounds that shape their individual expectations and perspectives about their roles, about the purpose of their organization, and about expectations for their own participation in governing that organization. Too often, they have little or no real training in understanding the complex nature of the systems they are selected to govern; they don’t fully understand the potential impact of decisions they make, and; there is lack of agreement among board members about the role the board is to play.

In these landscapes, we have identified tasks we believe are critical to success of a board of directors, along with capacities needed to accomplish those tasks. The models and methods connected below serve well to inform action, both in accomplishing the tasks and in building the capacities. We believe the role of any ''governing board'' is to engage in Adaptive Action in order to shape the patterns of interaction and decision making that will move their organization toward its mission and goals. Directors must do that by focusing not on operational and day-to-day activities and interactions, but by understanding the dynamics of the landscape, internal and external to the organization, and establishing policies and expectations that will set conditions for productive, sustainable patterns across the whole.

As we engage with board members, we support them in looking at their own landscapes to frame their most relevant questions, to gather and make sense of useful information from their own environments, and to take action to shift the patterns of interaction and decision making across their systems. The core capacities and the models and methods that seem most appropriate for individuals and/or groups are selected as the board members engages in Adaptive Action around their own development and performance. Toward that end we explored five fitness landscapes that frame the environment of leaders in a system:
1. Social – The human context of interactions and relationships.
2. Work – The productivity context of skills and abilities, roles and responsibilities.
3. Institutional – The organizational context in which the work is done.
4. Personal – The context of individual emotional, psychological, and physical health.
5. Ethical – The context of decision making that contributes to the good at all scales.


Tasks

In these landscapes, we identify '''tasks''' critical to success of a board of directors, along with '''capacities''' needed to accomplish those tasks. The models and methods connected below serve well to inform action, both in accomplishing the tasks and in building the core capacities.

See, understand, and influence systems – The members of a board of directors has, as their first obligation, the responsibility for building resilience in the organization they serve by understanding and influencing the ways their systems work. Their role is to set policy direction that 1) enables the entire organization to be sensitive to internal and external patterns of interaction and decision making that have an impact on the success of the system; 2) ensures prompt and appropriate responses that move the organization forward; and 3) increases resilience by building strength and coherence among the parts of their system. As we engage with board members in non-profits, in corporations and in the government at all levels, we support them in looking at their own landscapes to frame their most relevant questions, to gather and make sense of useful information from their own environments, and to take action to shift the patterns of interaction and decision making across their systems. The core capacities and the models and methods that seem most appropriate for individuals and/or groups are selected as the board members engages in Adaptive Action around their own development and performance.

Set conditions for learning – In today’s world, change happens in the stroke of a heartbeat, and organizations must have the capacity to respond in intelligent, rational ways to the emergent challenges they face. The board of directors, then, has a responsibility to ensure that, across the system, conditions are set that support learning at all levels. They work with the leadership to 1) ensure a robust knowledge base that supports ongoing learning and adaptation, 2) set expectations for individual and group commitment to high standards of performance, and 3) ensure connections exist that engage learners across their systems to share new learning and create coherent perspectives.

TASKS



Make effective, ethical decisions – The role of the board of directors is to set conditions for individuals and groups of employees to optimize their work to contribute to the organization’s overall mission and goals. The board accomplishes that by establishing policies to set expectations for themselves and others to 1) use data for decisions; 2) develop effective and productive plans; 3) evaluate the impact of their decisions and actions on the whole, the part, and the greater whole, 3) consider the impact of local actions on the larger scales; and 4) set conditions for effective stewardship of resources. '''See, understand, and influence systems'''
The members of a board of directors has, as their first obligation, the responsibility for building resilience in the organization they serve by understanding and influencing the ways their systems work. Their role is to set policy direction that:
* enables the entire organization to be sensitive to internal and external patterns of interaction and decision making that have an impact on the success of the system;
* ensures prompt and appropriate responses that move the organization forward; and
* increases resilience by building strength and coherence among the parts of their system.


Build sustainable networks – In an organization’s landscape, the board of directors represents one hub in the network of human interaction that carries out the work of the system. Because of its responsibility for overall functioning of the system, this role in building sustainable, resilient networks is critical and calls for board members to 1) communicate effectively, 2) respond to highly diverse constituencies, and 3) build productive connections others inside and outside the organization '''Set conditions for learning'''
In today’s world, change happens in the stroke of a heartbeat, and organizations must have the capacity to respond in intelligent, rational ways to the emergent challenges they face. The board of directors, then, has a responsibility to ensure that, across the system, conditions are set that support learning at all levels. They work with the leadership to:
* ensure a robust knowledge base that supports ongoing learning and adaptation;
* set expectations for individual and group commitment to high standards of performance; and
* ensure connections exist that engage learners across their systems to share new learning and create coherent perspectives.


Take care of self and others – In the face of the public and demanding role of serving on a board, those individuals have a responsibility to take care of themselves in ways that contribute to their effectiveness in serving others. Take care of self and others can play itself out in multiple ways, depending on the specific needs at any point in the system. At a very personal level, however, this task requires that board members act consistently over time and take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing. At the larger scale, it requires that they work for justice and find effective ways engage as citizens of the systems where they work. '''Make effective, ethical decisions'''
The role of the board of directors is to set conditions for individuals and groups of employees to optimize their work to contribute to the organization’s overall mission and goals. The board accomplishes that by establishing policies to set expectations for themselves and others to:
* use data for decisions;
* develop effective and productive plans;
* evaluate the impact of their decisions and actions on the whole, the part, and the greater whole;
* consider the impact of local actions on the larger scales; and
* set conditions for effective stewardship of resources.


Core Capacities

'''Build sustainable networks'''
In an organization’s landscape, the board of directors represents one hub in the network of human interaction that carries out the work of the system. Because of its responsibility for overall functioning of the system, this role in building sustainable, resilient networks is critical and calls for board members to:
* communicate effectively;
* respond to highly diverse constituencies: and
* build productive connections others inside and outside the organization.


'''Take care of self and others'''
In the face of the public and demanding role of serving on a board, those individuals have a responsibility to:
* take care of themselves in ways that contribute to their effectiveness in serving others. Doing so can play itself out in multiple ways, depending on the specific needs at any point in the system:
** at a very personal level, this task requires that board members act consistently over time and take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing; and
** at the larger scale, it requires that they work for justice and find effective ways engage as citizens of the systems where they work.

CORE CAPACITIES



Create an inclusive culture – Few groups in a system deal with the level of diversity that faces the board of directors. They are responsible to constituents, vendors, clients and customers, employees, leaders, regulators, and members of the larger community. In this milieu of difference, board members must create a culture that includes all voices and honors unique contributions and questions of individuals and groups.

Resolve conflict – Differences in a system can generate conflict as individuals and groups gauge their own behavior, as well as the actions of others, based on personal needs, expectations, and standards. As a hub in the network of interaction that swirls around an organization, the board of directors, individually and as a group, have a critical role in understanding the dynamics of difference and supporting members of the system in coming to terms with potential and actual conflict.

See and influence patterns – Living and working successfully in a complex system requires individuals to manipulate the patterns of interaction and decision making that shape their worlds. As leaders in their own systems, successful board members are intentional and make informed choices because they see and understand the underlying dynamics at work in the day-to-day functioning of their organizations and communities.

Lead change - At the policy level, board members have a three-prong role in setting conditions for effective change across the organization. First they set expectations for gathering internal and external data about conditions in the landscape. Second, they ensure that individuals across the system have the capacity to respond to the challenges and changes they encounter. Finally, board members model effective change strategies as they establish conditions within their own ranks that enable them to generate coherent patterns of adaptation and change.

Think and plan strategically – In the highly diverse, interdependent, and quickly changing landscape of today’s organizations, it is critical that the board of directors establish an organizational culture that plans effectively for understanding and responding to that landscape. Although they have no role in the day-to-day operational activities that respond to the challenges of change, they are responsible for setting overall direction and measures to assess organizational progress and success. Additionally they are responsible for setting conditions for coherent, focused planning across the system that ensures engagement and shared accountability for moving the system forward. Finally, members of the board of directors are responsible to work as a team, modeling effective planning as a group and individually.

Evaluate progress and success in a complex adaptive system – Traditional evaluation and assessment procedures treated organizations as linear and mechanistic: measuring such things as input vs output, process time and accuracy, similarity across the whole, individual performance against disparate competencies, and rankings against competitors or benchmarks. In complex adaptive systems, measures of this sort are less useful than those that account for the dynamics of the system and look at the various possibilities of interaction and productivity across the organizational landscape. Board members who understand this need are far better equipped to understand the real functioning of their systems and to establish patterns of accountability and productivity that are meaningful in assuring continuous improvement toward individual and systemic excellence.

Models & Methods




[Adaptive Action]


[Complex Adaptive System]


[CDE]


[Maturity Model]


[Evaluation in a CAS]


[Generative Engagement]


[Radical Inquiry]


[Simple Rules]


[Sustainability]

almost 2 years ago

CDE

by Heather Oxman
The Eoyang CDE describes the three conditions that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research about and with organizations. The three conditions, elegantly simple, are brief and powerful. The Eoyang CDE describes the three '''conditions''' that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research about and with organizations. The three conditions, elegantly simple, are brief and powerful.

Container bounds the system until patterns can begin to form. The container forms the boundary between one system and another (see "Boundaries":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/boundaries).
Differences represent significant diversities in the system, and are the points of emergence and change in a system.
Exchanges allow for movement of information and other resources across a system and between the system and its environment (see "Designing Exchanges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/designingexchanges).
'''The Container''' bounds the system until patterns can begin to form. Containers form the boundaries between one system and another (see "Boundaries":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/boundaries).

'''Differences''' represent significant diversities in the system, and are the points of emergence and change in a system.

'''Exchanges''' allow for movement of information and other resources across a system and between the system and its environment (see "Designing Exchanges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/designingexchanges).


Because we understand the dynamics at work when these conditions shape the self-organization that generates patterns in a system, we can take informed action to shift the conditions and shape the emergence of new patterns.

Containers can be concrete realities in the system, such as the physical location or space. They can also be concepts and ideas that draw people together. Meeting agendas, for example, create a boundary that shapes the patterns of flow and productivity in the meeting. Short agendas force quicker decision making and less discussion. Longer agendas allow for greater exploration of the differences in a system. Smaller containers generally speed up the emergence of patterns, larger containers allow more richness in those patterns. Rock stars or powerful political leaders are "conceptual" containers in that people are drawn to and influenced by them. Political or social ideology are also conceptual containers. Finally there are psychological or affinity containers--age, gender, personal bias, shared history, family ties, or background--that serve to bind individuals into identifiable groups. '''Containers''' can be concrete realities in the system, such as the physical location or space. They can also be concepts and ideas that draw people together. Meeting agendas, for example, create a boundary that shapes the patterns of flow and productivity in the meeting. Short agendas force quicker decision-making and less discussion. Longer agendas allow for greater exploration of the differences in a system. Smaller containers generally speed up the emergence of patterns, larger containers allow more richness in those patterns. Rock stars or powerful political leaders are "conceptual" containers in that people are drawn to and influenced by them. Political or social ideology can become conceptual containers. Finally there are psychological, or affinity, containers--age, gender, personal bias, shared history, family ties, background and so on--that serve to bind individuals into identifiable groups.

Difference in the system allows for change as the agents negotiate and accommodate the diversities that separate them. While a highly diverse system may have too many differences to count, the important shifts will happen around those differences that are most critical to the system's overall functioning. For instance there may be 10 people in a training; each one a unique and special human being. If you tried to deal with all the differences inside that training container, you would not be able to name them, much less consider their impact on the whole. On the other hand, in that training session, the degree of skill, understanding and difference in role (teacher or student) will establish patterns of interaction that will dominate the learning session. Difference may be represented by the kind of diversity that's present: leadership skills vs accounting skills; or it may be represented by degree of diversity: more or less experience in a given job. Increasing, decreasing, or introducing new differences will shift the conditions and change the emergent patterns in a system. '''Difference''' in the system allows for change as the agents negotiate and accommodate the diversities that separate them. While a highly diverse system usually has too many differences to count, the important shifts will happen around those differences that are most critical to the system's overall functioning. For instance, there may be ten people in a training room; each one a unique and special human being. If you tried to deal with all the differences inside that training container, you would not be able to name them, much less consider the impact of all those differences on the whole. On the other hand, in that training session, the degree of skill, understanding and difference in role (teacher or student) will establish patterns of interaction that could dominate the learning session. Or, difference may be represented by the kind of diversity that's present: leadership skills vs accounting skills; or it may be represented by degree of diversity: more or less experience in a given job. Increasing, decreasing, or introducing new differences will shift the conditions and change the emergent patterns in a system. Looking at the differences that make a difference in the system is a key aspect of CDE.

The third condition, exchanges, refers to how agents in a system connect among themselves and/or how it connects to the greater environment. Exchanges can be accomplished through typical, traditional human interaction; they can be the rules and regulations that inform decisions; resources such as money, goods, and time that represent value in a system; or what happens in the times we share, such as play, relationships, or work. Any of these provide connections that shape the patterns or our existence, and shifting exchanges will bring about change in the system. The third condition, '''exchanges''', refers to how agents in a system connect among themselves and/or how the system connects to the greater environment. Exchanges can be accomplished through typical, traditional human interaction; they can be the rules and regulations that inform decisions; resources such as money, goods, and time that represent value in a system; or what happens in the times agents share, such as play, relationships, or work. Any of these provide connections that shape the patterns of our existence, and shifting exchanges will bring about change in the system.

Because the three conditions are massively entangled with each other, it is only necessary to shift one to bring about change in the other two. For example, when I make a container smaller, generally the differences become more significant, and the exchanges happen faster. It is critical to remember, however, that, while you can anticipate the change you might trigger, you can neither predict nor control just what that change will be. HSD practitioners and professionals who use the CDE model to help them understand and influence the dynamics of their systems use "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptiveaction to enable them to respond appropriately when unexpected consequences arise. Because the three conditions are massively entangled with each other, it is only necessary to shift one condition to bring about change in the other two. For example, when I make a container smaller, generally the differences become more significant, and the exchanges happen faster. It is critical to remember, however, that, while you can anticipate the change you might trigger, you can neither predict nor control just what that change will be. HSD practitioners and professionals who use the CDE model to help them understand and influence the dynamics of their systems use "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptiveaction to enable them to respond appropriately when unexpected consequences arise.
about 2 years ago

CDE

by Heather Oxman
The Eoyang CDE describes the three conditions that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research in organizations. They are elegantly simple in their brevity and power. The Eoyang CDE describes the three conditions that determine speed, direction, and path of a system as it self-organizes. These conditions shape and express options and interactions of agents as they self-organize. The conditions bind them together such that they will connect across the differences in the system and generate patterns of behavior and thought. Glenda Eoyang discovered these conditions in her research about and with organizations. The three conditions, elegantly simple, are brief and powerful.

Container bounds the system until patterns can begin to form. The container forms the boundary between one system and another (see "Boundaries":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/boundaries).
Differences represent significant diversities in the system, and are the points of emergence and change in a system.
Exchanges allow for movement of information and other resources across a system and between the system and its environment (see "Designing Exchanges":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/designingexchanges).


Because we understand the dynamics at work when these conditions shape the self-organization that generates patterns in a system, we can take informed action to shift the conditions and shape the emergence of new patterns.

Containers can be concrete realities in the system, such as the physical location or space. They can also be concepts and ideas that draw people together. Meeting agendas, for example, create a boundary that shapes the patterns of flow and productivity in the meeting. Short agendas force quicker decision making and less discussion. Longer agendas allow for greater exploration of the differences in a system. Smaller containers generally speed up the emergence of patterns, larger containers allow more richness in those patterns. Rock stars or powerful political leaders are "conceptual" containers in that people are drawn to and influenced by them. Political or social ideology are also conceptual containers. Finally there are psychological or affinity containers--age, gender, personal bias, shared history, family ties, or background--that serve to bind individuals into identifiable groups.

Difference in the system allows for change as the agents negotiate and accommodate the diversities that separate them. While a highly diverse system may have too many differences to count, the important shifts will happen around those differences that are most critical to the system's overall functioning. For instance there may be 10 people in a training; each one a unique and special human being. If you tried to deal with all the differences inside that training container, you would not be able to name them, much less consider their impact on the whole. On the other hand, in that training session, the degree of skill, understanding and difference in role (teacher or student) will establish patterns of interaction that will dominate the learning session. Difference may be represented by the kind of diversity that's present: leadership skills vs accounting skills; or it may be represented by degree of diversity: more or less experience in a given job. Increasing, decreasing, or introducing new differences will shift the conditions and change the emergent patterns in a system.

The third condition, exchanges, refers to how agents in a system connect among themselves and/or how it connects to the greater environment. Exchanges can be accomplished through typical, traditional human interaction; they can be the rules and regulations that inform decisions; resources such as money, goods, and time that represent value in a system; or what happens in the times we share, such as play, relationships, or work. Any of these provide connections that shape the patterns or our existence, and shifting exchanges will bring about change in the system.

Because the three conditions are massively entangled with each other, it is only necessary to shift one to bring about change in the other two. For example, when I make a container smaller, generally the differences become more significant, and the exchanges happen faster. It is critical to remember, however, that, while you can anticipate the change you might trigger, you can neither predict nor control just what that change will be. HSD practitioners and professionals who use the CDE model to help them understand and influence the dynamics of their systems use "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptiveaction to enable them to respond appropriately when unexpected consequences arise.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/ComplexAdaptiveSystem and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/Complex Adaptive System and the best we can do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to either create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country. In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power, and those who want power, are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned it into nation-wide peaceful rebellion called "Occupy" or "We are the 99%" that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action. Wise practitioners and professionals take advantage of this phenomena intentionally in their work whether it's building a brand or creating political or social upheaval. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community, and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complexadaptivesystem and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/ComplexAdaptiveSystem and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive system and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complexadaptivesystem and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive action and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive system and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/compleadaptiveaction and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive action and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive system and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/compleadaptiveaction and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complex adaptive system and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complexadaptivesystem/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complex adaptive system/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complexadaptivesystem/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/model/complexadaptivesystem/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in Complex Adaptive Systems, and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in a "Complex Adaptive System":http::/wiki.hsdinstitute.org/complexadaptivesystem/ and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Butterfly Effects

by Heather Oxman
Prediction and control are impossible in [Complex Adaptive Systems], and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all. Prediction and control are impossible in Complex Adaptive Systems, and the best we can hope to do is anticipate and influence. We can never know how our actions will combine with other system dynamics to create huge impacts or to completely miss the mark and cause no impact at all.

Sometimes the system just seems poised to respond in exponential ways to whatever conditions are present at the initiation of an event. This is the source of “butterfly effects.” Given the right initial conditions, a small move in the beginning can trigger a huge response—like when a small amount of information can trigger a landslide shift in feelings across a system. Other times, initial conditions can damp any attempt to bring about huge changes.

This model reveals the essence of how public relations and marketing professionals do their work. The best of them know that the success and wide popularity of their products has less to do with the product itself and more to do with the conditions (Container, Differences, Exchanges) in the environment that shape the patterns of engagement and spending at any given point. Given that two versions or models of any product are generally essentially the same, the successful marketer will know that it is the demographic data (Container and Difference questions), the timeliness and quality of the service or product (Difference and Exchange questions), and the attractiveness and "hook" of the message (Exchange and Difference questions), that will make the difference between a product becoming a trend and its becoming a bust. YouTube videos that go viral do so because of the Butterfly Effects. Their popularity is generally less dependent on quality of the video than on the audience; their needs, interests, and cultural contexts; and the ways in which the messages are carried.

In these times of global social, economic, and political upheaval, individuals and groups who are in power and those who want power are seeing the "butterfly" impacts of their decisions and actions, even. In the spring of 2011, one young woman who said she would not be left homeless because she lost her job in an economic recession turned into nation-wide peaceful rebellion that resulted in public national debate about political and social equity and discrimination. Rebellion and revolution in one country ignites local voices in another country.

Wise practitioners and professionals who want to be intentional in their work build a brand or create political or social upheaval by taking advantage of this phenomenon. Knowing that they can't predict or control their exact impact, they use Adaptive Action to 1) see, understand, and influence patterns of decision making and interaction that frame the engagement of their products and ideas in the greater community and 2) make continuous adjustments over time as they see and gauge the impact of each cycle of action.
about 2 years ago

Boundaries

by Heather Oxman
A boundary exists in a complex system whenever same and different meet. A boundary can be:
- Physical (fences, building departments, walls, belts) These boundaries physically separate the diferences, holding the similarities together.
- Emotional (affiliation, love, hate, fear) Emotional boundaries draw people or repel them without physical limitations. - Emotional (affiliation, love, hate, fear) Emotional boundaries pull people in or repel them without physical limitations.
- Geographic (state or country borders, mountain ranges, oceans) These may be seen as physical boundaries, but they are natural boundaries separating geographic areas of the globe.
- Cultural (traditions, taboos, rituals) Cultural boundaries hold the community together and set them apart from others by the coherent patterns they generate within the community. - Cultural (traditions, conventions, beliefs, rituals) Cultural boundaries hold the community together and set them apart from others by the coherent patterns they generate within the community.
- Based on any relevant difference in the system - These separate teenage and neighborhood cliques, for instance, setting them apart from others who are otherwise just like them.

Sometimes boundaries are permeable--things can pass through them easily. Boundaries between parents and children exist primarily due to age and role differences, are most often permeable as they share information, resources, chores, and other resources of value within the family.

As connections have become more global and countries have become less regional, all parts of the globe are becoming more diverse. This diversity is forcing boundaries to become more permeable as groups that used to be isolated and strongly bound are finding they are interdependent with other groups around the world. Sometimes, however, those boundaries remain impermeable, causing conflict and bias between bounded groups.. As connections have become more global and countries have become less regional, all parts of the globe are becoming more diverse. This diversity is forcing boundaries to become more permeable as groups that used to be isolated and strongly bound are finding they are interdependent with other groups around the world. Sometimes, however, those boundaries remain impermeable, causing conflict and bias between bounded groups.

Sometimes boundaries are explicit, as in a culture's use of surnames to shape identity. In earlier times, the tribe or community to which you belonged defined you, both inside and outside the group. Your last name was an explicit statement of the boundary where you stopped and the "other" started. That particular way of defining difference between self and other has continued through centuries fo cultural development, even though its evolution has taken slightly different paths, depending on local culture.

Sometimes boundaries are implicit. In today's diverse culture, it is not always necessary or politically correct to make all boundaries explicit. For instance, in the US, employers cannot make employment decisions based on gender or age. Those boundaries that define who someone is as male or female, and those that somehow separate "young" from "middle age" from "old" may be differences, but they legally cannot be considered as differences that make a difference when US employers are hiring. Sometimes boundaries are implicit. In today's diverse culture, it is not always necessary or politically correct to make all boundaries explicit. For instance, in some countries, law dictates that employers cannot make employment decisions based on gender or age or physical disability. Those boundaries that define who someone is as male or female, and those that somehow separate "young" from "middle age" from "old" or an amputee, or blind or hearing impaired, may be differences, but they legally cannot be considered as differences that make a difference when those employers are hiring.

At the same time, there are individuals for whom particular characteristics are preferred. For them, race or religion or social class or background or life style may become an implicit boundary--one that is not spoken or described by law, but that is observed by tradition, action, and preference. This can be a productive preference when it strengthens a community or builds trust and a sense of belonging. On the other hand, taken to the extreme, this can also be the source of bias and prejudice. At the same time, there are individuals for whom particular characteristics are preferred. For them, race or religion or social class or background or life style may become an implicit boundary--one that is not spoken or described by law, but that is observed by tradition, action, and preference. When hiring a new scholar in a religious community, for instance, it would be essential to the Jewish community that their scholar be Jewish, to the Islamic community that their scholar be Muslim, and to the Baptist community that their scholar be Christian. Imagining otherwise would be an interesting shift in patterns and boundary permeability. This boundary condition of impermeability however, can be a productive preference when it strengthens a community or builds trust and a sense of belonging. On the other hand, taken to the extreme, this can also be the source of bias and prejudice.

Any boundary generates turbulence, but turbulence can be productive (like learning or love) or it can be destructive (like bias or war). The other conditions of the system (container and exchange) determine the nature of the turbulence at any given boundary. Any boundary generates turbulence, but turbulence can be productive (like learning or love) or it can be destructive (like bias or war). The other conditions of the system (container and exchange) determine the nature of the turbulence at any given boundary.
about 2 years ago

HSD Magic 21

by Heather Oxman
In HSD, we believe that three conditions in the system shape the speed, path, and direction of self-organization--they shape the patterns that emerge in the system. In her ground-breaking research, Glenda Eoyang named these conditions as Container, Difference, and Exchanges. For thorough desciption of these conditions, please see visit the "CDE page":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/cde of this wiki.

The HSD Magic 21 is a way of using the CDE to focus in on particular patterns in your system as you engage in "Adaptive Action":http://wiki.hsdinstitute.org/adaptive_action.

In the "What?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you see specific conditions that are shaping patterns of your wicked issue. In the "What?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you see specific conditions that are shaping patterns of your wicked issue.

In the "So what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you consider the impact of each conditions and identify informed, wise action to influence your patterns. In the "So what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you consider the impact of each conditions and identify informed, wise action to influence your patterns.

In the "Now what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you take action, focus your attention as you watch for change, and move you into your next iteration of inquiry. In the "Now what?" phase of Adaptive Action, the Magic 21 helps you take action, focus your attention as you watch for change, and move you into your next iteration of inquiry.

The attachment below offers a specific protocol for working through a Magic 21, and includes a specific example of how it can be used.
about 2 years ago

Live Virtual Workshops, 2015

by Royce Holladay
The monthly live virtual workshops about the power of Human Systems Dynamics and Adaptive Action continue into 2015. Each month, Glenda Eoyang, founder of the field of HSD, shares insights and perspectives about applying HSD in a number of areas. Once each quarter we invite HSD Associates to share their work and insights about using Adaptive Action.

EVENT? — See the schedule below

TIMES? — All times are 11am – 12noon (Central Time) – Except the Quarterly Meetings in March, June, September, and December, which are scheduled to last 2 hours: 11am – 1pm (Central Time)

COST? — FREE

Registration? — For all sessions, "Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

Schedule

*--March 19, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--April 2, 2015*
*_Through the Looking Glass: The Altered Reality of HSD_*
_Explore an alternative science and join an alternative practice to find breakthrough solutions to the most sticky issues. 19th Century theory and 20th Century practice keep us stuck in our 21st Century problems. Until we think about reality differently, we will not act differently. Until we act differently, we will not solve our most difficult problems. Step through the HSD looking glass to see in surprising ways, imagine innovations, and take Adaptive Action._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--May 7, 2015*
*_Healing Healthcare: Our Shared Future_*
_Make choices that support health and wellbeing for yourself, your family, team, organization, and community today and for years to come._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 4, 2015*
*_Leadership for the 22nd Century: Taking Action Today_*
_Not science fiction, but science fact: today’s leadership shapes tomorrow’s world. What are today’s leadership behaviors that support successful and sustainable futures?_
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 18m 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--July, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--August 6, 2015*
*_Change Is an Art: The Esthetics of Organizational Life_*
_The line between science and art fade away in the HSD world of patterns and adaptive action. Create energy and coherence for change for you and your organization._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 3, 2015*
*_Beyond Alignment: Simple Rules for Coherence in Chaos_*
_Two things ensure success in chaotic times. Similarity gives stability, and difference gives potential. Coherence—especially in chaotic times—demands that everyone balance similarity and difference for themselves. Simple rules tell them how. _
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--October 8, 2015*
*_Heterarchy: Change in the Fast Lane_*
_Learn to inspire and influence change that begins in every point and moves in all directions. Action from the top-down, bottom-up, and everything in between sets conditions for adaptive emergence for people, process, and policy._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--November 5, 2015*
*_Adaptive Action Comes Home: Integrating Emotional Knowing_*
_Tension moves us to action. Intellectual, social, emotional, physical—any source of tension creates the opportunity and impetus for change. Learn how to integrate all of these energies into powerful decision making and action taking._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 3, 2015*
*Aging: The complex patterns of personal change*
_Three HSD tools help you keep your balance through personal transitions, as old powers fade._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--Archives:* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*--January, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--February 5, 2015*
*_Peace is a Pattern: Adaptive Action and Conflict_*
_What fundamental assumptions sustain conflict? What alternatives can HSD offer for seeing conflict in new ways? How can it help us imagine opportunities for peace? What would it mean to take effective Adaptive Action to shift patterns toward health and wellbeing for people, families, and communities? Join this inquiry and move toward your own Adaptive Action for peace and justice._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p285m707354/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.

*--March 5, 2015*
*_Innovation & Replication: Making Decisions and Taking Action in Complexity_*
_Adapt your strategies to be most fit for function. Know when to innovate for emergent opportunities and when to replicate for reliable performance._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p6hn48spcpt/
For a .pdf copy of the slides, see the attachments below.


*--March 19, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--April 2, 2015*
*_Through the Looking Glass: The Altered Reality of HSD_*
_Explore an alternative science and join an alternative practice to find breakthrough solutions to the most sticky issues. 19th Century theory and 20th Century practice keep us stuck in our 21st Century problems. Until we think about reality differently, we will not act differently. Until we act differently, we will not solve our most difficult problems. Step through the HSD looking glass to see in surprising ways, imagine innovations, and take Adaptive Action._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--May 7, 2015*
*_Healing Healthcare: Our Shared Future_*
_Make choices that support health and wellbeing for yourself, your family, team, organization, and community today and for years to come._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 4, 2015*
*_Leadership for the 22nd Century: Taking Action Today_*
_Not science fiction, but science fact: today’s leadership shapes tomorrow’s world. What are today’s leadership behaviors that support successful and sustainable futures?_
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--June 18m 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--July, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--August 6, 2015*
*_Change Is an Art: The Esthetics of Organizational Life_*
_The line between science and art fade away in the HSD world of patterns and adaptive action. Create energy and coherence for change for you and your organization._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 3, 2015*
*_Beyond Alignment: Simple Rules for Coherence in Chaos_*
_Two things ensure success in chaotic times. Similarity gives stability, and difference gives potential. Coherence—especially in chaotic times—demands that everyone balance similarity and difference for themselves. Simple rules tell them how. _
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--September 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--October 8, 2015*
*_Heterarchy: Change in the Fast Lane_*
_Learn to inspire and influence change that begins in every point and moves in all directions. Action from the top-down, bottom-up, and everything in between sets conditions for adaptive emergence for people, process, and policy._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--November 5, 2015*
*_Adaptive Action Comes Home: Integrating Emotional Knowing_*
_Tension moves us to action. Intellectual, social, emotional, physical—any source of tension creates the opportunity and impetus for change. Learn how to integrate all of these energies into powerful decision making and action taking._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 3, 2015*
*Aging: The complex patterns of personal change*
_Three HSD tools help you keep your balance through personal transitions, as old powers fade._
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--December 17, 2015*
*Quarterly meeting* for HSD Associates and Friends. Time is from 11am - 1pm Central time. Come hear HSD Associates share their HSD stories about applications of the theory and practice in their work or lives.
"Register here.":http://www.adaptiveaction.org/Landing-Pages/Webinar-Registration

*--Archives:* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*--January, 2015 - No LVW scheduled*

*--February 5, 2015*
*_Peace is a Pattern: Adaptive Action and Conflict_*
_What fundamental assumptions sustain conflict? What alternatives can HSD offer for seeing conflict in new ways? How can it help us imagine opportunities for peace? What would it mean to take effective Adaptive Action to shift patterns toward health and wellbeing for people, families, and communities? Join this inquiry and move toward your own Adaptive Action for peace and justice._
For Archives of this session follow "this link.":http://hsdinstitute.adobeconnect.com/p285m707354/
For a .pdf copy of the slides see the attachments below.

Archives
about 2 years ago

Architectural Model

by Heather Oxman
In HSD we consider the alignment among what we believe, how we work together, and the ways we support that work. This model is useful whether we need to explore new ways of working together and when we want to examine what currently exists. In building a home or office space, the purpose a room is to serve (its function) sets the parameters for the structures that create that space. Form (structure) follows purpose (function). There should be a similar alignment in organizations. Operational and functional structures and constructs that dictate the work should align with what we believe and how we function to live out those beliefs. In HSD we consider the alignment of what we believe with how we work together and the ways we support that work. This alignment is useful whether we need to explore new ways of working together or when we want to examine what currently exists. In building a home or office space, the purpose a room will serve (its function) sets the parameters for the structures that create that space. Form (structure) follows function (purpose). There should be a similar alignment in organizations. Operational and functional structures and constructs that shape the work should align with what we believe and how we live out those beliefs.

Complex systems require organizational structures that allow us to function in adaptive and responsive ways, according to the work we have to do and according to what we believe about the work we have to do. So we take the “Form follows function” saying to the next level: “Form follows function, which flows from what we believe to be important.” The model invites us to dialogue about the following questions:
# What do we believe about our work? Beliefs can be tricky to talk about. Using this model does not call for extended word-smithing about flowery belief statements. It’s just asking us to get clear about the basic beliefs or assumptions we carry about our work. What do we believe or value about customer service? What do we know from research about what constitutes effective practice? What do we consider to be important about how we treat people and get our work done?
# How do we need to function to live out our beliefs? Belief statements are only of value if they lead to action. So it’s important to move from the discussion of what we believe about our work to a discussion of what that means about how we function together to live out those beliefs. This is one reason we work with groups to identify their simple rules. Those are the brief, generalizable action statements that inform interactions and decision making to build coherent patterns across the whole.
# What organizational structures, constructs, and connections will allow us to function in those ways? A functioning system is made up of different types of structures that work interdependently to as we do our work. When thinking about structures in a system, think about 1) the content of the work we do; 2) the ways we share resources and information; 3) how and by whom decisions get made; and 4) who is accountable for what and how we hold each other accountable.
Step into the Architectural Model; use it to examine the structures in your system. What alignment do you find? Where might you shift your current structures or establish new ones that help you function in ways that let you live out what you believe about the work you have committed to do.
Complex systems require organizational structures that allow us to operate in adaptive and responsive ways, according to the work we have to do and according to what we believe about the work we have to do. So we take the “Form follows function” saying to the next level: “Form follows function, which flows from what we believe to be important.” The architectural model invites us to dialogue about the following questions:
# What do we believe about our work? Beliefs can be tricky to talk about. Using this model does not call for extended word-smithing about flowery belief statements: just get clear about the basic beliefs or assumptions we carry about our work. What do we believe or value about customer service? What do we know from research about what constitutes effective practice? What do we consider to be important about how we treat people and get our work done?
# How do we need to act to live out our beliefs? Belief statements are only of value if they lead to action. So it’s important to move from the discussion of what we believe about our work to a discussion of what that means about how we function together to live out those beliefs. This is one reason HSD Associates work with groups to identify their simple rules. "Simple Rules":http://hsdinstitute.org/simple_rules are the brief, generalizable action statements that inform interactions and decision making to build coherent patterns across the whole.
# What organizational structures, constructs, and connections will allow us to act in those ways? A functioning system is made up of different types of structures that work interdependently to support us as we do our work. When thinking about structures in a system, think about 1) the content of the work we do; 2) the ways we share resources and information; 3) how and by whom decisions get made; and 4) who is accountable for what and how we hold each other accountable.
Step into the Architectural Model; use it to examine the structures in your system. What alignment(s) do you find? Where might you shift your current structures or establish new ones that help you act in ways that let you live out what you believe about the work you have committed to do.
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